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Australian Garden Orb Weaver (Eriophora transmarina)

The Australian Garden Orb Weaver is a species of common fat-bellied spiders. It is a member of the family Araneidae that includes 3122 species in 172 genera, around the world. They are often seen in bushy areas in Australia, waiting upside down in their web, patiently waiting for their prey.

Scientific Classification

Australian Garden Orb Weaver

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: The females are relatively larger than the male, with the former having a length of 20 to 25 mm, while the latter having 15 to 17 mm.

Color: usually have mottled brown bodies, but individuals exhibit a large range of colors, from off-white through tan to almost black. Some specimens have a longitudinal stripe in white or red, running down the middle of the abdomen.

Other Characteristic Features: They have a stout body with a large, almost triangular abdomen in the shape of a leaf, having two distinct humps towards the front.

Garden Orb Weaver

Eggs

After copulation, the female lays its eggs in a silk egg sac which remains attached to a structure close by. The eggs generally hatch around a month later.

Spiderlings

The baby spiders usually come out during spring. The mother takes care of the young ones and tries to keep them safe from predators until they are considerably matured. The juveniles take very less time to develop and attain sexual maturity by summer.

Australian Garden Orb Weaver Spiderling

How Poisonous is the Australian Garden Orb-Weaver Spider

There have been very nominal bite reports. Garden orb-weavers are otherwise harmless except for when they feel threatened. Their bite is not dangerous to humans; however, a bitten area may induce moderate, local pain, some redness, and rarely, a little swelling that might last for 30 minutes to up to three to four hours.

Australian Garden Orb Weaver Web
Australian Garden Orb Weaver Image

Quick Facts

Lifespan The females live for up to twelve months, while the males die soon after mating
Distribution Mainly across the coastal regions of the eastern states of the Australian continent
Habitat Mostly in the openings between trees and shrubs
Common predators Mainly the birds, with the most common being the honeyeaters
Diet Insects, commonly bugs, flies, beetles, as well as large prey like cicadas
Australian Garden Orb Weaver Spider
Australian Garden Orb Weaver Picture

Did You Know

  • They often weave their webs near lights where there are higher chances for insects to approach flying.
  • It is one of the rare species that would play dead when threatened or in danger.
  • These spiders remove their web each day at dawn and reconstruct a new one each night.

Image Credits: Arachne.org.au, I.pinimg.com, Earthnworld.com, Australiangeographic.com.au, I.ytimg.com

The Australian Garden Orb Weaver is a species of common fat-bellied spiders. It is a member of the family Araneidae that includes 3122 species in 172 genera, around the world. They are often seen in bushy areas in Australia, waiting upside down in their web, patiently waiting for their prey.

Australian Garden Orb Weaver

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: The females are relatively larger than the male, with the former having a length of 20 to 25 mm, while the latter having 15 to 17 mm.

Color: usually have mottled brown bodies, but individuals exhibit a large range of colors, from off-white through tan to almost black. Some specimens have a longitudinal stripe in white or red, running down the middle of the abdomen.

Other Characteristic Features: They have a stout body with a large, almost triangular abdomen in the shape of a leaf, having two distinct humps towards the front.

Garden Orb Weaver

Eggs

After copulation, the female lays its eggs in a silk egg sac which remains attached to a structure close by. The eggs generally hatch around a month later.

Spiderlings

The baby spiders usually come out during spring. The mother takes care of the young ones and tries to keep them safe from predators until they are considerably matured. The juveniles take very less time to develop and attain sexual maturity by summer.

Australian Garden Orb Weaver Spiderling

How Poisonous is the Australian Garden Orb-Weaver Spider

There have been very nominal bite reports. Garden orb-weavers are otherwise harmless except for when they feel threatened. Their bite is not dangerous to humans; however, a bitten area may induce moderate, local pain, some redness, and rarely, a little swelling that might last for 30 minutes to up to three to four hours.

Australian Garden Orb Weaver Web
Australian Garden Orb Weaver Image

Quick Facts

Lifespan The females live for up to twelve months, while the males die soon after mating
Distribution Mainly across the coastal regions of the eastern states of the Australian continent
Habitat Mostly in the openings between trees and shrubs
Common predators Mainly the birds, with the most common being the honeyeaters
Diet Insects, commonly bugs, flies, beetles, as well as large prey like cicadas
Australian Garden Orb Weaver Spider
Australian Garden Orb Weaver Picture

Did You Know

  • They often weave their webs near lights where there are higher chances for insects to approach flying.
  • It is one of the rare species that would play dead when threatened or in danger.
  • These spiders remove their web each day at dawn and reconstruct a new one each night.

Image Credits: Arachne.org.au, I.pinimg.com, Earthnworld.com, Australiangeographic.com.au, I.ytimg.com

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