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Badumna Spider: Facts ,Identifications & Pictures Badumna Spider: Facts ,Identifications & Pictures

Badumna

Badumna spiders are special critters found in places like Australia, Asia, and America. They’re known as intertidal spiders and are super important in the places they live, even if they’re not always in the spotlight. In this blog, we’ll dive into some neat facts about these amazing spiders.

Scientific Classification

Badumna Spider

List of Spiders Belonging To This Genus

  • Badumna arguta
  • Badumna bimetallica
  • Badumna blochmanni
  • Badumna exilis
  • Badumna exsiccata
  • Badumna guttipes
  • Badumna hirsuta
  • Badumna hygrophila
  • Black House (Badumna insignis)
  • Badumna javana
  • Grey House (Badumna longinqua)
  • Badumna maculata
  • Badumna microps
  • Badumna pilosa
  • Badumna scalaris
  • Badumna senilella
  • Badumna socialis
  • Badumna tangae

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

  • Size: The females are larger than the males, though the size differs from one species to the other. Females can reach lengths of up to 18mm (1.8 cm), while males are usually smaller, measuring up to about 10mm (1 cm).
  • Color: The spiders of this genus have a dark body, with a light shade on their abdomen. 

Eggs

The eggs of most of the species of this genus are white and round.

Spiderlings

The juveniles are also small, with most of them dispersing from their mother on maturation.

The Web

Spiders of this genus weave webs to trap their prey, though the pattern differs from one species to the other. The black house spider (Badumna insignis) makes a messy web with a funnel-shaped retreat situated at the center or corner of their mesh.

Badumna Web

Are Badumna Spiders Venomous?

Yes, Badumna Spiders do have venom. They use it to catch the bugs they munch on. But for people, it’s usually not too strong.

Can Badumna Spiders Bite?

Badumna Spiders can bite, but they’re mostly quiet critters. They’ll only bite if they feel really cornered or scared.

Ecological Importance and Behavior of the Badumna Spider

Badumna spiders are vital in the ecosystem, controlling insect populations, benefiting plants, and preventing pest overpopulation.

Natural Predator: Although the Badumna spiders are adept hunters, they’re not at the top of the food chain. They often fall prey to larger predators, such as birds, wasps, and bigger spiders. These checks and balances ensure that no one species dominates and maintains the ecological equilibrium.

Prey-Predator Dynamics: Badumna spiders trap bees, ants, and wasps with unique webs, playing a key role in controlling pest populations.

Relationship with Humans: Badumna spiders, often found in human structures and trees, are beneficial cohabitants. They pose no venomous threat to humans and help reduce pests like flies and mosquitoes, indirectly promoting healthier living conditions.

Quick Facts

LifespanApproximately two years
Distribution Continents of Asia, America, and Australia
HabitatHuman structures and buildings, as well as rough-barked trees
Diet Bees, butterflies, ants, flies, beetles and wasps

Badumna Insignis

Did You Know

  • Swedish arachnologist, Tamerlan Thorell described the Badumna for the first time in 1890.
  • The black house spider or Badumna insignis is the most popular species of this genus.

In conclusion, by fostering a deeper understanding and appreciation for the Badumna spiders, we can better appreciate their role in our ecosystems and the invaluable services they provide, often unnoticed and uncredited.

Badumna spiders are special critters found in places like Australia, Asia, and America. They’re known as intertidal spiders and are super important in the places they live, even if they’re not always in the spotlight. In this blog, we’ll dive into some neat facts about these amazing spiders.

Badumna Spider

List of Spiders Belonging To This Genus

  • Badumna arguta
  • Badumna bimetallica
  • Badumna blochmanni
  • Badumna exilis
  • Badumna exsiccata
  • Badumna guttipes
  • Badumna hirsuta
  • Badumna hygrophila
  • Black House (Badumna insignis)
  • Badumna javana
  • Grey House (Badumna longinqua)
  • Badumna maculata
  • Badumna microps
  • Badumna pilosa
  • Badumna scalaris
  • Badumna senilella
  • Badumna socialis
  • Badumna tangae

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

  • Size: The females are larger than the males, though the size differs from one species to the other. Females can reach lengths of up to 18mm (1.8 cm), while males are usually smaller, measuring up to about 10mm (1 cm).
  • Color: The spiders of this genus have a dark body, with a light shade on their abdomen. 

Eggs

The eggs of most of the species of this genus are white and round.

Spiderlings

The juveniles are also small, with most of them dispersing from their mother on maturation.

The Web

Spiders of this genus weave webs to trap their prey, though the pattern differs from one species to the other. The black house spider (Badumna insignis) makes a messy web with a funnel-shaped retreat situated at the center or corner of their mesh.

Badumna Web

Are Badumna Spiders Venomous?

Yes, Badumna Spiders do have venom. They use it to catch the bugs they munch on. But for people, it’s usually not too strong.

Can Badumna Spiders Bite?

Badumna Spiders can bite, but they’re mostly quiet critters. They’ll only bite if they feel really cornered or scared.

Ecological Importance and Behavior of the Badumna Spider

Badumna spiders are vital in the ecosystem, controlling insect populations, benefiting plants, and preventing pest overpopulation.

Natural Predator: Although the Badumna spiders are adept hunters, they’re not at the top of the food chain. They often fall prey to larger predators, such as birds, wasps, and bigger spiders. These checks and balances ensure that no one species dominates and maintains the ecological equilibrium.

Prey-Predator Dynamics: Badumna spiders trap bees, ants, and wasps with unique webs, playing a key role in controlling pest populations.

Relationship with Humans: Badumna spiders, often found in human structures and trees, are beneficial cohabitants. They pose no venomous threat to humans and help reduce pests like flies and mosquitoes, indirectly promoting healthier living conditions.

Quick Facts

LifespanApproximately two years
Distribution Continents of Asia, America, and Australia
HabitatHuman structures and buildings, as well as rough-barked trees
Diet Bees, butterflies, ants, flies, beetles and wasps

Badumna Insignis

Did You Know

  • Swedish arachnologist, Tamerlan Thorell described the Badumna for the first time in 1890.
  • The black house spider or Badumna insignis is the most popular species of this genus.

In conclusion, by fostering a deeper understanding and appreciation for the Badumna spiders, we can better appreciate their role in our ecosystems and the invaluable services they provide, often unnoticed and uncredited.