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Brachypelma smithi

Brachypelma smithi is a tarantula endemic to Mexico. It is very similar to Brachypelma hamorii, with both spiders sharing the name Mexican redknee tarantula. This similarity has confused several sources who have even mistakenly classified the two as the same species.

Brachypelma smithi

Scientific Classification

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: 12.7 to 14 cm

Color: In males, the carapace is beige or yellowish-brown with a black square, while females have a more bluish-black or dark pattern like a starburst on their carapaces. The abdomen of these spiders is black, while the legs are divided into orange and black segments.

Other Characteristic Features: Sexual dimorphism exists in this species as the females are larger than the males.

Eggs

Following the mating and laying of the fertilized eggs, the female will wrap them in webbing. She then carries the egg sac around in her mouthparts until they are ready to hatch.

Spiderlings

After 1-3 months, the eggs hatch, though the spiderlings, or slings, will remain inside the egg sac for 3 weeks more. Once this period has passed, they stay in the burrow for another 2 weeks before dispersing, becoming independent by this stage.

Males sexually mature at 4 years of age, while females do so later at 6-7 years.

The Web

Like other tarantulas, these spiders do not construct elaborate webbing for capturing prey. However, they will lay down a carpet of silk threads in front of their burrow to help them detect any intruders.

Is the Brachypelma smithi Venomous

While their bite is venomous, it is not fatal and causes pain comparable to a wasp or bee sting.

Brachypelma smithi Tarantula

Quick Facts

Other names Mexican redknee tarantula
Lifespan Males: 10 years, Females: 25-30 years
Distribution Mexico, specifically the state of Guerrero
Habitat Tropical deciduous forests
Predators White-nosed coati, pepsis wasps
Diet Frogs, large insects, mice

Did You Know

  • English arachnologist Frederick Octavius Pickard-Cambridge first described this spider in 1897.
  • The IUCN classifies this tarantula as “Near Threatened” or “NT” due to illegal trading.

Image Source: reddit.com, cdn.pixabay.com

Brachypelma smithi is a tarantula endemic to Mexico. It is very similar to Brachypelma hamorii, with both spiders sharing the name Mexican redknee tarantula. This similarity has confused several sources who have even mistakenly classified the two as the same species.

Brachypelma smithi

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: 12.7 to 14 cm

Color: In males, the carapace is beige or yellowish-brown with a black square, while females have a more bluish-black or dark pattern like a starburst on their carapaces. The abdomen of these spiders is black, while the legs are divided into orange and black segments.

Other Characteristic Features: Sexual dimorphism exists in this species as the females are larger than the males.

Eggs

Following the mating and laying of the fertilized eggs, the female will wrap them in webbing. She then carries the egg sac around in her mouthparts until they are ready to hatch.

Spiderlings

After 1-3 months, the eggs hatch, though the spiderlings, or slings, will remain inside the egg sac for 3 weeks more. Once this period has passed, they stay in the burrow for another 2 weeks before dispersing, becoming independent by this stage.

Males sexually mature at 4 years of age, while females do so later at 6-7 years.

The Web

Like other tarantulas, these spiders do not construct elaborate webbing for capturing prey. However, they will lay down a carpet of silk threads in front of their burrow to help them detect any intruders.

Is the Brachypelma smithi Venomous

While their bite is venomous, it is not fatal and causes pain comparable to a wasp or bee sting.

Brachypelma smithi Tarantula

Quick Facts

Other names Mexican redknee tarantula
Lifespan Males: 10 years, Females: 25-30 years
Distribution Mexico, specifically the state of Guerrero
Habitat Tropical deciduous forests
Predators White-nosed coati, pepsis wasps
Diet Frogs, large insects, mice

Did You Know

  • English arachnologist Frederick Octavius Pickard-Cambridge first described this spider in 1897.
  • The IUCN classifies this tarantula as “Near Threatened” or “NT” due to illegal trading.

Image Source: reddit.com, cdn.pixabay.com

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