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Celaenia

Celaenia belongs to the genus of orb-weaver spiders indigenous to Australia. At present, as per the April 2019 records, there are 11 species in this genus.

Celaenia

Spiders Belonging to this Genus

Celaenia atkinsoni  Celaenia calotoides  Celaenia distincta  
Celaenia dubia  Bird-dropping Spider (Celaenia excavate)  Celaenia hectori
Celaenia olivaceaCelaenia pennaCelaenia tuberosa
Celaenia tumidosaCelaenia voraginosa

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: The females of this genus have a size of about 0.47 to 0.51 inches (12 to 13 mm) and are bigger than the males, which have an approximate body length of 0.07 to 0.11 inches (2 to 3 mm).

Color: The color varies from one species to the other. The bird-dropping spider, the most well-known species of this genus, has a white, black, and gray body, similar to a bird’s dropping.

Other Characteristic Features: The spiders of this genus are likely to have a triangular-shaped abdomen and long forelegs.

Eggs

The egg sacs are brown and marble-shaped with a single sac containing about 200 eggs.

Spiderlings

The spiderlings mostly have a light-colored body, darkening with maturation.

The Web

Not much information is available about their web. However, in the bird-dropping spiders, only the young ones build circular webs.

Are Spiders of the Celaenia Genus Venomous

Though their levels of toxicity remain undetermined, a bite from this species could lead to minor redness and pain.

Quick Facts

DistributionParts of Australia and New Zealand
HabitatForests, woodlands, and wetlands
PredatorsMostly birds
DietInsects particularly moth
LifespanApproximately 1 year

Did You Know

  • Swedish arachnologist Tamerlan Thorell described this genus first in 1868.

Image Source: Live.staticflickr.com

Celaenia belongs to the genus of orb-weaver spiders indigenous to Australia. At present, as per the April 2019 records, there are 11 species in this genus.

Celaenia

Spiders Belonging to this Genus

Celaenia atkinsoni  Celaenia calotoides  Celaenia distincta  
Celaenia dubia  Bird-dropping Spider (Celaenia excavate)  Celaenia hectori
Celaenia olivaceaCelaenia pennaCelaenia tuberosa
Celaenia tumidosaCelaenia voraginosa

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: The females of this genus have a size of about 0.47 to 0.51 inches (12 to 13 mm) and are bigger than the males, which have an approximate body length of 0.07 to 0.11 inches (2 to 3 mm).

Color: The color varies from one species to the other. The bird-dropping spider, the most well-known species of this genus, has a white, black, and gray body, similar to a bird’s dropping.

Other Characteristic Features: The spiders of this genus are likely to have a triangular-shaped abdomen and long forelegs.

Eggs

The egg sacs are brown and marble-shaped with a single sac containing about 200 eggs.

Spiderlings

The spiderlings mostly have a light-colored body, darkening with maturation.

The Web

Not much information is available about their web. However, in the bird-dropping spiders, only the young ones build circular webs.

Are Spiders of the Celaenia Genus Venomous

Though their levels of toxicity remain undetermined, a bite from this species could lead to minor redness and pain.

Quick Facts

DistributionParts of Australia and New Zealand
HabitatForests, woodlands, and wetlands
PredatorsMostly birds
DietInsects particularly moth
LifespanApproximately 1 year

Did You Know

  • Swedish arachnologist Tamerlan Thorell described this genus first in 1868.

Image Source: Live.staticflickr.com

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