Cyclocosmia

Cyclocosmia, a genus belonging to the mygalomorph trapdoor species of the Halonoproctidae family, has ten species as per the April 2019 records. They were initially a member of the Ctenizidae until 2018, after which the family underwent a split.

Cyclocosmia

Scientific Classification

Spiders Belonging To This Genus 

Ravine Trapdoor (Cyclocosmia truncate)  Torreya Trap-door (Cyclocosmia torreya)  Cyclocosmia lannaensis  
Cyclocosmia latusicosta  Cyclocosmia liui  Cyclocosmia loricata  
Cyclocosmia ricketti  Cyclocosmia siamensis  Cyclocosmia sublatusicosta  
Cyclocosmia subricketti    

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: The females of this genus are bigger than males. Cyclocosmia ricketti species are 1.1 inches (28 mm) long, having 0.63 inches (16 mm) disk diameter.

Color: Most spiders of this genus have a brown body with the patterns varying from one species to another.

Other Characteristic Features: Their abdomen having a spiny projection is truncated abruptly, ending in hardened disks, strengthened by ribs and grooves.

Eggs

They are small and round with a pale coloration.

Spiderlings

Information about the spiderlings remains unavailable, though, like most other species, they too go on their own after maturation.

The Web

Being a genus of trapdoor spiders, they do not spin webs like most other species. Instead, they have a trapdoor-like structure on top of their burrow having a depth of 2.8 to 5.9 inches (7 to 15 cm). There is also a silk lining only at the bottom of the burrow.

Are Spiders of the Cyclocosmia Genus Venomous

Most spiders of this genus are known to have a low level of toxicity, not causing harm to humans.

Quick Facts

DistributionUnited States and parts of Asia (China, Thailand, Laos, and Vietnam)
HabitatMostly live underground in warm places but may even build their burrows
PredatorsWasps and scorpions
DietCricket, moth, beetles, and grasshopper
LifespanApproximately 5 – 10 years

Did You Know

  • Austrian naturalist Anton Ausserer described the genus first in 1871.
  • They follow the phenomenon of phragmosis, where they use their body as a shield while defending themselves in their burrow against predators.
  • Their name is derived from the Greek words kyklos (circle) and kosmeo (to adorn).

Image Source: Myhourglasscollection.com

Cyclocosmia, a genus belonging to the mygalomorph trapdoor species of the Halonoproctidae family, has ten species as per the April 2019 records. They were initially a member of the Ctenizidae until 2018, after which the family underwent a split.

Cyclocosmia

Spiders Belonging To This Genus 

Ravine Trapdoor (Cyclocosmia truncate)  Torreya Trap-door (Cyclocosmia torreya)  Cyclocosmia lannaensis  
Cyclocosmia latusicosta  Cyclocosmia liui  Cyclocosmia loricata  
Cyclocosmia ricketti  Cyclocosmia siamensis  Cyclocosmia sublatusicosta  
Cyclocosmia subricketti    

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: The females of this genus are bigger than males. Cyclocosmia ricketti species are 1.1 inches (28 mm) long, having 0.63 inches (16 mm) disk diameter.

Color: Most spiders of this genus have a brown body with the patterns varying from one species to another.

Other Characteristic Features: Their abdomen having a spiny projection is truncated abruptly, ending in hardened disks, strengthened by ribs and grooves.

Eggs

They are small and round with a pale coloration.

Spiderlings

Information about the spiderlings remains unavailable, though, like most other species, they too go on their own after maturation.

The Web

Being a genus of trapdoor spiders, they do not spin webs like most other species. Instead, they have a trapdoor-like structure on top of their burrow having a depth of 2.8 to 5.9 inches (7 to 15 cm). There is also a silk lining only at the bottom of the burrow.

Are Spiders of the Cyclocosmia Genus Venomous

Most spiders of this genus are known to have a low level of toxicity, not causing harm to humans.

Quick Facts

DistributionUnited States and parts of Asia (China, Thailand, Laos, and Vietnam)
HabitatMostly live underground in warm places but may even build their burrows
PredatorsWasps and scorpions
DietCricket, moth, beetles, and grasshopper
LifespanApproximately 5 – 10 years

Did You Know

  • Austrian naturalist Anton Ausserer described the genus first in 1871.
  • They follow the phenomenon of phragmosis, where they use their body as a shield while defending themselves in their burrow against predators.
  • Their name is derived from the Greek words kyklos (circle) and kosmeo (to adorn).

Image Source: Myhourglasscollection.com

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