Delena

Delena, a small genus belongs to the family of huntsman spiders comprising of about four species.

Delena Spider

Spiders Belonging to this Genus

Avondale (Delena cancerides)

Delena craboides Delena gloriosa
Delena nigrifrons

Physical Description & Identification

Adults

Size: Females are approximately 3 cm (1.8 inches) long, while males have a body length of about 2.5 cm (0.98 inches)

Color: The four species of this genus have a brown body, though the patterns and markings may differ.

Other Characteristic Features: Spiders of this genus have a hairy appearance.

Eggs

The sac is flat and oval, having about 200 eggs on an average.

Spiderlings

They remain with their mother for a couple of weeks and then drift apart to thrive on their own.

Are Spiders of the Delena Genus Venomous and Do They Bite

They are harmless to humans, but their bites could cause swelling, pain, and redness alongside other symptoms.

Quick Facts

Lifespan Approximately two years
Distribution Different parts of Australia and New Zealand
Habitat Dry, dark places
Diet Insects

Did You Know

  • Charles Athanase Walckenaer described this genus first in the year 1837.

Image Credits: collections.museumvictoria.com.au

Delena, a small genus belongs to the family of huntsman spiders comprising of about four species.

Delena Spider

Spiders Belonging to this Genus

Avondale (Delena cancerides)

Delena craboides Delena gloriosa
Delena nigrifrons

Physical Description & Identification

Adults

Size: Females are approximately 3 cm (1.8 inches) long, while males have a body length of about 2.5 cm (0.98 inches)

Color: The four species of this genus have a brown body, though the patterns and markings may differ.

Other Characteristic Features: Spiders of this genus have a hairy appearance.

Eggs

The sac is flat and oval, having about 200 eggs on an average.

Spiderlings

They remain with their mother for a couple of weeks and then drift apart to thrive on their own.

Are Spiders of the Delena Genus Venomous and Do They Bite

They are harmless to humans, but their bites could cause swelling, pain, and redness alongside other symptoms.

Quick Facts

Lifespan Approximately two years
Distribution Different parts of Australia and New Zealand
Habitat Dry, dark places
Diet Insects

Did You Know

  • Charles Athanase Walckenaer described this genus first in the year 1837.

Image Credits: collections.museumvictoria.com.au

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