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Eresus moravicus: Facts, Identification & Pictures Eresus moravicus: Facts, Identification & Pictures
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Eresus moravicus

The Eresus moravicus, also known as the velvet spider, calls central Europe home. This spider became its own species when Eresus cinnaberinus split into three different types. Here, we’ll share interesting facts about this unique spider.

Scientific Classification

Eresus Moravicus

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

  • Size: 0.35-0.56 cm

Eresus Moravicus Size

  • Color: Male: The male has a black prosoma and a red abdomen with four black spots. Female: They are all black, with orange hairs on the cephalothorax.
  • Other Characteristic Features: Males have bright orange legs.

Eggs

These spiders lay eggs inside a sac made of webbing.

Spiderlings

Juveniles are violet, with white setae all over their bodies.

The Web

They spin very messy webs in which they entangle their prey.

Eresus Moravicus Male

Are Eresus moravicus Spiders Venomous?

Yes, Eresus moravicus spiders have venom, like most spiders, to help them catch their prey.

Can Eresus moravicus Spiders Bite?

Yes, they can bite if they feel threatened, but bites are uncommon and not considered dangerous to humans. A bite from this spider is known to cause headache and fever; however, its venom is not fatal.

Ecological Importance and Behavior of Eresus moravicus

The Eresus moravicus serves an essential role in the ecosystems of central Europe, acting as both a predator and a population control agent for insects. These spiders exhibit a solitary lifestyle, predominantly hunting ground-dwelling insects which helps to maintain a balanced ecosystem.

Natural Predator: Despite being a hunter itself, the velvet spider has its share of natural threats. Birds, larger spiders, and parasitic wasps are among the primary predators of the Eresus moravicus.

Prey-Predator Dynamics: The relationship between the velvet spider and its prey is a fine example of nature’s delicate balance. Their predatory skills help keep insect populations in check, while their natural predators prevent them from becoming too numerous.

Relationship with Humans: Human encounters with Eresus moravicus spiders are infrequent, and bites are rare. When they do happen, they can cause mild symptoms like headache and fever but are not fatal, making the Eresus moravicus relatively harmless to humans.

Eresus Moravicus Image

Quick Facts

LifespanAround 5 years
DistributionAlbania, Austria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Serbia, and Slovakia
HabitatVaried
DietInsects

Did You Know

  • Czech zoologist Milan Řezáč first described this spider in 2008.

Eresus Moravicus Picture

In summary, the velvet spider, with its unique appearance and ecological role, is a captivating subject for study and appreciation.

The Eresus moravicus, also known as the velvet spider, calls central Europe home. This spider became its own species when Eresus cinnaberinus split into three different types. Here, we’ll share interesting facts about this unique spider.

Eresus Moravicus

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

  • Size: 0.35-0.56 cm

Eresus Moravicus Size

  • Color: Male: The male has a black prosoma and a red abdomen with four black spots. Female: They are all black, with orange hairs on the cephalothorax.
  • Other Characteristic Features: Males have bright orange legs.

Eggs

These spiders lay eggs inside a sac made of webbing.

Spiderlings

Juveniles are violet, with white setae all over their bodies.

The Web

They spin very messy webs in which they entangle their prey.

Eresus Moravicus Male

Are Eresus moravicus Spiders Venomous?

Yes, Eresus moravicus spiders have venom, like most spiders, to help them catch their prey.

Can Eresus moravicus Spiders Bite?

Yes, they can bite if they feel threatened, but bites are uncommon and not considered dangerous to humans. A bite from this spider is known to cause headache and fever; however, its venom is not fatal.

Ecological Importance and Behavior of Eresus moravicus

The Eresus moravicus serves an essential role in the ecosystems of central Europe, acting as both a predator and a population control agent for insects. These spiders exhibit a solitary lifestyle, predominantly hunting ground-dwelling insects which helps to maintain a balanced ecosystem.

Natural Predator: Despite being a hunter itself, the velvet spider has its share of natural threats. Birds, larger spiders, and parasitic wasps are among the primary predators of the Eresus moravicus.

Prey-Predator Dynamics: The relationship between the velvet spider and its prey is a fine example of nature’s delicate balance. Their predatory skills help keep insect populations in check, while their natural predators prevent them from becoming too numerous.

Relationship with Humans: Human encounters with Eresus moravicus spiders are infrequent, and bites are rare. When they do happen, they can cause mild symptoms like headache and fever but are not fatal, making the Eresus moravicus relatively harmless to humans.

Eresus Moravicus Image

Quick Facts

LifespanAround 5 years
DistributionAlbania, Austria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Serbia, and Slovakia
HabitatVaried
DietInsects

Did You Know

  • Czech zoologist Milan Řezáč first described this spider in 2008.

Eresus Moravicus Picture

In summary, the velvet spider, with its unique appearance and ecological role, is a captivating subject for study and appreciation.