Herpyllus

Herpyllus belongs to the seventh-largest family of spiders, the ground spiders. According to the May 2019 records, this genus has 33 species, 13 of which occupy different parts of North America. The remaining species are scattered through South America and the Central and South Asian countries of Turkmenistan and Afghanistan.

Herpyllus Spider

Spider Belonging to this Genus

  • Parson (Herpyllus ecclesiasticus)
  • Herpyllus australis
  • Herpyllus bensonae
  • Herpyllus brachet
  • Herpyllus bubulcus
  • Herpyllus calcuttaensis
  • Herpyllus coahuilanus
  • Herpyllus cockerelli
  • Herpyllus convallis
  • Herpyllus coreanus
  • Herpyllus ecclesiasticus
  • Herpyllus emertoni
  • Herpyllus excelsus
  • Herpyllus fidelis
  • Herpyllus frio
  • Herpyllus gertschi
  • Herpyllus giganteus
  • Herpyllus goaensis
  • Herpyllus hesperolus
  • Herpyllus iguala
  • Herpyllus lativulvus
  • Herpyllus malkini
  • Herpyllus paropanisadensis 
  • Herpyllus perditus
  • Herpyllus perote
  • Herpyllus pictus
  • Herpyllus propinquus
  • Herpyllus proximus
  • Herpyllus regnans
  • Herpyllus reservatus
  • Herpyllus scholasticus
  • Herpyllus schwarzi
  • Herpyllus sherus
  • Herpyllus vicinus

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Females are around 0.51 inches (1.2 cm), while males are smaller.

Scientific Classification

Color: Most spiders of this genus have a black or brown body.

Other Characteristic Features: Some species like the Eastern parson spider have markings on their abdomen.

Eggs

Eggs are laid in a round and silky white sac deposited under barks and logs.

Spiderlings

Most of the spiderlings have a pale brown body, closely similar in appearance to adult spiders.

The Web

Like other ground spiders, those belonging to this genus also do not spin a web. Instead, they take shelter under debris and rocks.

Are Spiders of the Herpyllus GenusVenomous

They may bite if trapped between one’s clothing and skin, which may trigger allergic reactions. However, their venom is not known to produce any lethal or harmful effect on humans.

Quick Facts

Distribution USA, Mexico, Afghanistan, Turkmenistan, Argentina, Korea, and India
Habitat Deciduous forests and gardens
Diet Small insects
Lifespan 1-2 years

Did You Know

  • Nicholas Marcellus Hentz, an American arachnologist, described this genus in 1832.

Image Credits: inaturalist.org

Herpyllus belongs to the seventh-largest family of spiders, the ground spiders. According to the May 2019 records, this genus has 33 species, 13 of which occupy different parts of North America. The remaining species are scattered through South America and the Central and South Asian countries of Turkmenistan and Afghanistan.

Herpyllus Spider

Spider Belonging to this Genus

  • Parson (Herpyllus ecclesiasticus)
  • Herpyllus australis
  • Herpyllus bensonae
  • Herpyllus brachet
  • Herpyllus bubulcus
  • Herpyllus calcuttaensis
  • Herpyllus coahuilanus
  • Herpyllus cockerelli
  • Herpyllus convallis
  • Herpyllus coreanus
  • Herpyllus ecclesiasticus
  • Herpyllus emertoni
  • Herpyllus excelsus
  • Herpyllus fidelis
  • Herpyllus frio
  • Herpyllus gertschi
  • Herpyllus giganteus
  • Herpyllus goaensis
  • Herpyllus hesperolus
  • Herpyllus iguala
  • Herpyllus lativulvus
  • Herpyllus malkini
  • Herpyllus paropanisadensis 
  • Herpyllus perditus
  • Herpyllus perote
  • Herpyllus pictus
  • Herpyllus propinquus
  • Herpyllus proximus
  • Herpyllus regnans
  • Herpyllus reservatus
  • Herpyllus scholasticus
  • Herpyllus schwarzi
  • Herpyllus sherus
  • Herpyllus vicinus

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Females are around 0.51 inches (1.2 cm), while males are smaller.

Color: Most spiders of this genus have a black or brown body.

Other Characteristic Features: Some species like the Eastern parson spider have markings on their abdomen.

Eggs

Eggs are laid in a round and silky white sac deposited under barks and logs.

Spiderlings

Most of the spiderlings have a pale brown body, closely similar in appearance to adult spiders.

The Web

Like other ground spiders, those belonging to this genus also do not spin a web. Instead, they take shelter under debris and rocks.

Are Spiders of the Herpyllus GenusVenomous

They may bite if trapped between one’s clothing and skin, which may trigger allergic reactions. However, their venom is not known to produce any lethal or harmful effect on humans.

Quick Facts

Distribution USA, Mexico, Afghanistan, Turkmenistan, Argentina, Korea, and India
Habitat Deciduous forests and gardens
Diet Small insects
Lifespan 1-2 years

Did You Know

  • Nicholas Marcellus Hentz, an American arachnologist, described this genus in 1832.

Image Credits: inaturalist.org

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