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Hobo (Eratigena agrestis)

Hobo spiders are a part of the funnel-web spiders, though not similar to the Australian funnel-web. Some of its scientific synonyms include Philoica agrestis, Tegenaria rhaetica, Tegenaria magnacava, Tegenaria osellai, and Tegenaria trinacriae. It has a wide distribution, spreading throughout Europe, Central Asia, and North America.

Hobo Spider

Scientific Classification

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Females are 0.43 – 0.59 inches (1.1 – 1.5 cm), while the smaller males measure 0.31 – 0.43 inches (0.8 – 1.1 cm) . The leg span is 2.54-5.08 inches (6.4-12.9 cm).

Color: They have an overall brown body. Identifying these spiders can be difficult since they look closely similar to other ‘brown’ spiders.

Other Characteristic Features: The abdomen is oblong with a chevron pattern running through the center.

Sexual dimorphism is visible in these spiders. In males, the palps are similar to boxing gloves, while in the females, it does not appear so swollen. Males even have a smaller abdomen than their female counterparts.

Hobo Spider Size

Eggs

The female hobo spider lays eggs during September that go on to hatch the following spring. The mother produces about four sacs in her lifetime containing 100 eggs each, which she attaches to the bottom of an object or the surface nearby.

Hobo Spider Egg

Spiderlings

Juvenile spiders emerge around June, and they go through several molting phases before reaching adulthood. It takes around one or two months to attain complete maturity.

The Web

They build trampoline-shaped horizontal webs close to woodpiles, and brick walls, where the spider shelters, waiting for its prey to arrive.

Are Hobo Spiders Venomous

Earlier theories suggest that necrosis or skin death could be an effect of the hobo spider bite, but the 2017 reports refute this fact and do not include this species under the list of venomous spiders.

Is a Hobo Spider’s Bite Dangerous

Their bite goes unnoticed initially, but in 15 minutes, the victim could sense numbness and pain in the affected area. It may eventually turn red, harden, and become swollen. In the case of severity, the area could turn black after a fluid discharge. However, no fatality has been recorded.

Although some conflicting theories say that nausea, headache, dry mouth are symptoms of the hobo spider bite, it has not been medically confirmed.

Male Hobo Spider
Female Hobo Spider

Quick Facts

Distribution North America, Central Asia, and Europe
Habitat Fields, crevices, basements, moist and dark areas
Diet Insects and other spiders
Web-type Funnel-shaped
Predators Other bigger spiders and ants
IUCN Conservation Status Not listed
Hobo Spider Image

Did You Know

  • French scientist and civil servant BaronĀ Charles Athanase Walckenaer described this species for the first time in 1802 as Aranea agrestis. Later, in 1841, he transferred it to the Tegenaria genus, and finally, it became a part of the Eratigena genus.
  • Its brown body makes it closely similar to the brown recluse, though the latter is distinguished by a violin-shaped marking on top of its abdomen.
Hobo Spider Pictures

Image Credits: Cdn-prod.medicalnewstoday.com, City-data.com, Dogcarseat.co, Burkemuseum.org, Catseyepest.com, bugguide.net,
Spiderid.com, Victoriabugzoo.ca

Hobo spiders are a part of the funnel-web spiders, though not similar to the Australian funnel-web. Some of its scientific synonyms include Philoica agrestis, Tegenaria rhaetica, Tegenaria magnacava, Tegenaria osellai, and Tegenaria trinacriae. It has a wide distribution, spreading throughout Europe, Central Asia, and North America.

Hobo Spider

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Females are 0.43 – 0.59 inches (1.1 – 1.5 cm), while the smaller males measure 0.31 – 0.43 inches (0.8 – 1.1 cm) . The leg span is 2.54-5.08 inches (6.4-12.9 cm).

Color: They have an overall brown body. Identifying these spiders can be difficult since they look closely similar to other ‘brown’ spiders.

Other Characteristic Features: The abdomen is oblong with a chevron pattern running through the center.

Sexual dimorphism is visible in these spiders. In males, the palps are similar to boxing gloves, while in the females, it does not appear so swollen. Males even have a smaller abdomen than their female counterparts.

Hobo Spider Size

Eggs

The female hobo spider lays eggs during September that go on to hatch the following spring. The mother produces about four sacs in her lifetime containing 100 eggs each, which she attaches to the bottom of an object or the surface nearby.

Hobo Spider Egg

Spiderlings

Juvenile spiders emerge around June, and they go through several molting phases before reaching adulthood. It takes around one or two months to attain complete maturity.

The Web

They build trampoline-shaped horizontal webs close to woodpiles, and brick walls, where the spider shelters, waiting for its prey to arrive.

Are Hobo Spiders Venomous

Earlier theories suggest that necrosis or skin death could be an effect of the hobo spider bite, but the 2017 reports refute this fact and do not include this species under the list of venomous spiders.

Is a Hobo Spider’s Bite Dangerous

Their bite goes unnoticed initially, but in 15 minutes, the victim could sense numbness and pain in the affected area. It may eventually turn red, harden, and become swollen. In the case of severity, the area could turn black after a fluid discharge. However, no fatality has been recorded.

Although some conflicting theories say that nausea, headache, dry mouth are symptoms of the hobo spider bite, it has not been medically confirmed.

Male Hobo Spider
Female Hobo Spider

Quick Facts

Distribution North America, Central Asia, and Europe
Habitat Fields, crevices, basements, moist and dark areas
Diet Insects and other spiders
Web-type Funnel-shaped
Predators Other bigger spiders and ants
IUCN Conservation Status Not listed
Hobo Spider Image

Did You Know

  • French scientist and civil servant BaronĀ Charles Athanase Walckenaer described this species for the first time in 1802 as Aranea agrestis. Later, in 1841, he transferred it to the Tegenaria genus, and finally, it became a part of the Eratigena genus.
  • Its brown body makes it closely similar to the brown recluse, though the latter is distinguished by a violin-shaped marking on top of its abdomen.
Hobo Spider Pictures

Image Credits: Cdn-prod.medicalnewstoday.com, City-data.com, Dogcarseat.co, Burkemuseum.org, Catseyepest.com, bugguide.net,
Spiderid.com, Victoriabugzoo.ca

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