Hogna

This large genus of wolf spiders is spread throughout the world. Scientists are studying the genus extensively, and much more research is needed.

Hogna Spider

Spider Belonging to this Genus

Carolina Wolf (Hogna carolinensis)

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: From 0.87 in (2.2 cm) to 4.7 in (12 cm), female spiders are always larger than males.

Color: Mostly brown with some specific patterns on the body, varying from one species to another.

Other Characteristic Features: Their legs are extensively long.

Eggs

Eggs are kept and grown inside a sac.

Spiderlings

They stay with their mother initially, but after a few weeks, they go away.

The Web

Some species in this genus make webs while others do not.

Are Spiders of Hogna Genus Venomous

Spiders who belong to this genus do not want to bite humans unless they feel threatened. Their bite is similar to a bee sting, and the pain is also like that, but nothing fatal is resulted usually.

Quick Facts

Distribution East Africa, Mexico, Baleric Island, St. Helena, South Africa, Panama, US, Congo, Ethiopia, Argentina, Kazakhstan, Liberia, Tasmania, Rwanda, Namibia
Habitat Burrows or forests
Diet Insects
Lifespan From a few months to couple of years

Did You Know

  • The genus once included a species Tigrosa helluo, that now belongs to the Tigrosa genus.

Image Credits: naturdata.com

This large genus of wolf spiders is spread throughout the world. Scientists are studying the genus extensively, and much more research is needed.

Hogna Spider

Spider Belonging to this Genus

Carolina Wolf (Hogna carolinensis)

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: From 0.87 in (2.2 cm) to 4.7 in (12 cm), female spiders are always larger than males.

Color: Mostly brown with some specific patterns on the body, varying from one species to another.

Other Characteristic Features: Their legs are extensively long.

Eggs

Eggs are kept and grown inside a sac.

Spiderlings

They stay with their mother initially, but after a few weeks, they go away.

The Web

Some species in this genus make webs while others do not.

Are Spiders of Hogna Genus Venomous

Spiders who belong to this genus do not want to bite humans unless they feel threatened. Their bite is similar to a bee sting, and the pain is also like that, but nothing fatal is resulted usually.

Quick Facts

Distribution East Africa, Mexico, Baleric Island, St. Helena, South Africa, Panama, US, Congo, Ethiopia, Argentina, Kazakhstan, Liberia, Tasmania, Rwanda, Namibia
Habitat Burrows or forests
Diet Insects
Lifespan From a few months to couple of years

Did You Know

  • The genus once included a species Tigrosa helluo, that now belongs to the Tigrosa genus.

Image Credits: naturdata.com

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