Home / Wolf Spiders / Kauaʻi Cave Wolf Spider (Adelocosa anops)

Kauaʻi Cave Wolf Spider (Adelocosa anops)

The Kaua’i cave wolf spider or the blind spider as it is alternately called by the local residents is a rare species indigenous to Kauai’s  Koloa Poipu region in the Hawaiian Islands, with only six populations existing at present.

Kauai Cave Wolf Spider

Scientific Classification

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: They are 20 mm or 0.8 inches in length.

Color: These spiders have a reddish brown carapace, silvery abdomen, and beige or pale orange legs.

Other characteristics:  The wolf spiders generally have two big eyes, situated in the center of their eight eyes, but these species are different devoid of any eyes, which also earn them the name big-eyed or no-eyed wolf spider.

Eggs

Only 15 to 30 eggs are produced per clutch and the egg sac is carried by the mother till the time the spiderlings hatch.

Kauai Cave Wolf Spider Egg

Spiderlings

Once the juvenile spiders mature a little after being hatched, they disperse and are on their own.

Kauai Cave Wolf Spiderling

The Web

The wolf spiders are swift with a sharp vision that helps them in capturing prey, hence they do not need to spin sticky webs for the purpose. Hence, following the trend of their family the Kaua’i cave wolf spiders also do not spin webs and stalk their preys actively.

Does the Kaua ‘I Cave Wolf Spider Bite and is it Dangerous

These spiders are not harmful and may bite only if provoked or threatened. However, there have been no reports of the toxicity of its venom and its harm to human life is unknown.

Quick Facts

Other names Blind-eye spider, Big-eyed spider
Lifespan Males: 1 year approximately Females: Longer than males, may be for several years
Distribution Kaua’I region of Hawaiian islands
Habitat Being cave spiders, they are found in cave-bearing rocks, subterranean cracks, spaces, and voids
Diet Crickets, ants,  small lizards, grasshoppers, and different kinds of small invertebrates
IUCN Conservation Status Endangered

Did You Know

  • These species along with the Kaua’I cave amphipod, which is one of the spider’s primary prey was categorized as endangered on the 14th of January, 2000.
  • The number of spiders and amphipods has not been more than 30 and 80 respectively.
  • Since they dwell in caves, these spiders require a constant source of moisture, stagnant air, and a temperature range between 75 and 80°F.

Image Credits: Pbs.twimg.com, Fws.gov, Biolib.cz

The Kaua’i cave wolf spider or the blind spider as it is alternately called by the local residents is a rare species indigenous to Kauai’s  Koloa Poipu region in the Hawaiian Islands, with only six populations existing at present.

Kauai Cave Wolf Spider

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: They are 20 mm or 0.8 inches in length.

Color: These spiders have a reddish brown carapace, silvery abdomen, and beige or pale orange legs.

Other characteristics:  The wolf spiders generally have two big eyes, situated in the center of their eight eyes, but these species are different devoid of any eyes, which also earn them the name big-eyed or no-eyed wolf spider.

Eggs

Only 15 to 30 eggs are produced per clutch and the egg sac is carried by the mother till the time the spiderlings hatch.

Kauai Cave Wolf Spider Egg

Spiderlings

Once the juvenile spiders mature a little after being hatched, they disperse and are on their own.

Kauai Cave Wolf Spiderling

The Web

The wolf spiders are swift with a sharp vision that helps them in capturing prey, hence they do not need to spin sticky webs for the purpose. Hence, following the trend of their family the Kaua’i cave wolf spiders also do not spin webs and stalk their preys actively.

Does the Kaua ‘I Cave Wolf Spider Bite and is it Dangerous

These spiders are not harmful and may bite only if provoked or threatened. However, there have been no reports of the toxicity of its venom and its harm to human life is unknown.

Quick Facts

Other names Blind-eye spider, Big-eyed spider
Lifespan Males: 1 year approximately Females: Longer than males, may be for several years
Distribution Kaua’I region of Hawaiian islands
Habitat Being cave spiders, they are found in cave-bearing rocks, subterranean cracks, spaces, and voids
Diet Crickets, ants,  small lizards, grasshoppers, and different kinds of small invertebrates
IUCN Conservation Status Endangered

Did You Know

  • These species along with the Kaua’I cave amphipod, which is one of the spider’s primary prey was categorized as endangered on the 14th of January, 2000.
  • The number of spiders and amphipods has not been more than 30 and 80 respectively.
  • Since they dwell in caves, these spiders require a constant source of moisture, stagnant air, and a temperature range between 75 and 80°F.

Image Credits: Pbs.twimg.com, Fws.gov, Biolib.cz

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