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Leaf (Phonognatha graeffei)

The leaf or leaf curling spider is an orb-weaving species indigenous to the eastern, southern and north-eastern parts of Australia. They are commonly seen seeking shelter within a curled leaf located at the middle of their web, thus resulting in their name.

Scientific Classification

Leaf Spider

Physical Description & Identification

Adults

Size: The males are 5 – 6 mm long, while females have a length of 8-12 mm.

Color: The male and female spiders are similar when it comes to coloration, having a reddish-brown body and legs alongside a cream pattern on the back.

Other Characteristic Features: They have fat, oval-shaped bodies along with long tapering legs.

Leaf Spider Size

Eggs

The eggs are laid within a curled leaf suspended at a distance from the foliage.

Spiderlings

The juvenile spiders begin to bend over a small-sized green leaf and eventually move on to bigger ones.

The Web

The web of these spiders can be identified in an easy way which has a diameter of about 30 cm. It is in the shape of an incomplete circle, open at the upper part and fanning in a downward direction.

Is the Green Leaf Spider Venomous and Does it Bite

It is not harmful since it has small fangs with a timid nature, being reluctant to sting unless provoked. They may rarely bite mankind and their toxicity to human beings is unknown, causing not much pain excepting localized swelling or redness.

Leaf Spider Male

Quick Facts

Other Names Leaf Curling spider
Distribution Eastern, southern, north-eastern states of Australia
Habitat Open woodland, forest, as well as gardens in suburban and urban regions
Diet Flying insects
Predators Birds, parasitic wasps
Lifespan Approximately 1 year
Leaf Spider Female

Did You Know

  • These spiders remain active during the day and safeguard themselves from predators by sitting within the silk-seamed leaves that are curled.
Phonognatha Graeffei
Leaf Curling Spider

Image Credits: Arachne.org.au, Media.australianmuseum.net.au, Photos.smugmug.com, Findaspider.org.au, Live.staticflickr.com,
Arachne.org.au, Canberra.naturemapr.org

The leaf or leaf curling spider is an orb-weaving species indigenous to the eastern, southern and north-eastern parts of Australia. They are commonly seen seeking shelter within a curled leaf located at the middle of their web, thus resulting in their name.

Leaf Spider

Physical Description & Identification

Adults

Size: The males are 5 – 6 mm long, while females have a length of 8-12 mm.

Color: The male and female spiders are similar when it comes to coloration, having a reddish-brown body and legs alongside a cream pattern on the back.

Other Characteristic Features: They have fat, oval-shaped bodies along with long tapering legs.

Leaf Spider Size

Eggs

The eggs are laid within a curled leaf suspended at a distance from the foliage.

Spiderlings

The juvenile spiders begin to bend over a small-sized green leaf and eventually move on to bigger ones.

The Web

The web of these spiders can be identified in an easy way which has a diameter of about 30 cm. It is in the shape of an incomplete circle, open at the upper part and fanning in a downward direction.

Is the Green Leaf Spider Venomous and Does it Bite

It is not harmful since it has small fangs with a timid nature, being reluctant to sting unless provoked. They may rarely bite mankind and their toxicity to human beings is unknown, causing not much pain excepting localized swelling or redness.

Leaf Spider Male

Quick Facts

Other Names Leaf Curling spider
Distribution Eastern, southern, north-eastern states of Australia
Habitat Open woodland, forest, as well as gardens in suburban and urban regions
Diet Flying insects
Predators Birds, parasitic wasps
Lifespan Approximately 1 year
Leaf Spider Female

Did You Know

  • These spiders remain active during the day and safeguard themselves from predators by sitting within the silk-seamed leaves that are curled.
Phonognatha Graeffei
Leaf Curling Spider

Image Credits: Arachne.org.au, Media.australianmuseum.net.au, Photos.smugmug.com, Findaspider.org.au, Live.staticflickr.com,
Arachne.org.au, Canberra.naturemapr.org

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