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Orange Baboon Tarantula (Pterinochilus murinus)

Orange baboon tarantula is an Old World species, found throughout Africa. Its striking orange coloration makess it a common preference for hobbyists. However, because of its aggressive nature, novice owners might not be able to handle it well.

Orange Baboon Tarantula

Scientific Classification

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Females are 4 – 6 inches (10.16 – 15.24 cm) long and males are 3 – 4 inches (7.62 – 10.16 cm).

Color: They have an orange body with bright rings on their legs.

However, they come in five color variants based on the region they occur.

Brown Color Form (BCF) – Tete and Mozambique

Red Color Form (RCF) – Usambara Mountain area
Typical Colour Form (TCF) – Kenya, Mozambique
Dark Colour Form (DCF) – Botswana, Kigoma, Kenya, and Mikumi
Orange Colour Form (OCF) – Usambara Mountains

Other Characteristic Features: The abdomen exhibits a fishbone pattern while the carapace appears in the shape of a star.

Orange Baboon Tarantula Size

Eggs

Females produce silken sacs having 75 – 100 round, pale green eggs.

Spiderlings

After around 5 weeks of egg-laying, the spiderlings emerge, having a fast-paced growth.

Orange Baboon Tarantula Sling

The Web

They make funnel-shaped webs, filled with a lot of substrates.

Orange Baboon Tarantula Web

Are Orange Baboon Tarantula Poisonous

These aggressive spiders may inflict painful bites if threatened. However, their venom does not have lethal effects on humans.

Orange Baboon Tarantula Habitat

Quick Facts

Other Names Mombasa golden starburst tarantula, orange bitey thing or OBT, Usambara baboon, and pterror
Distribution Eastern, Southern, and Central Africa
Habitat Burrows
Web Type Funnel-shaped
Diet Grasshoppers, crickets, and sometimes mice
Lifespan Females: 15 – 20 years Males: 5 – 8 years
IUCN Conservation Status Not listed
Mombasa Golden Starburst Tarantula

Did You Know

  • It was described by British zoologist Reginald Innes Pocock in 1897.
Usambara Baboon Tarantula

Image Credits: Thefridayspider.files.wordpress.com, I.pinimg.com, Arachnoboards.com, Photobucket.com, Deviantart.com, Mikebasictarantula.com

Orange baboon tarantula is an Old World species, found throughout Africa. Its striking orange coloration makess it a common preference for hobbyists. However, because of its aggressive nature, novice owners might not be able to handle it well.

Orange Baboon Tarantula

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Females are 4 – 6 inches (10.16 – 15.24 cm) long and males are 3 – 4 inches (7.62 – 10.16 cm).

Color: They have an orange body with bright rings on their legs.

However, they come in five color variants based on the region they occur.

Brown Color Form (BCF) – Tete and Mozambique

Red Color Form (RCF) – Usambara Mountain area
Typical Colour Form (TCF) – Kenya, Mozambique
Dark Colour Form (DCF) – Botswana, Kigoma, Kenya, and Mikumi
Orange Colour Form (OCF) – Usambara Mountains

Other Characteristic Features: The abdomen exhibits a fishbone pattern while the carapace appears in the shape of a star.

Orange Baboon Tarantula Size

Eggs

Females produce silken sacs having 75 – 100 round, pale green eggs.

Spiderlings

After around 5 weeks of egg-laying, the spiderlings emerge, having a fast-paced growth.

Orange Baboon Tarantula Sling

The Web

They make funnel-shaped webs, filled with a lot of substrates.

Orange Baboon Tarantula Web

Are Orange Baboon Tarantula Poisonous

These aggressive spiders may inflict painful bites if threatened. However, their venom does not have lethal effects on humans.

Orange Baboon Tarantula Habitat

Quick Facts

Other Names Mombasa golden starburst tarantula, orange bitey thing or OBT, Usambara baboon, and pterror
Distribution Eastern, Southern, and Central Africa
Habitat Burrows
Web Type Funnel-shaped
Diet Grasshoppers, crickets, and sometimes mice
Lifespan Females: 15 – 20 years Males: 5 – 8 years
IUCN Conservation Status Not listed
Mombasa Golden Starburst Tarantula

Did You Know

  • It was described by British zoologist Reginald Innes Pocock in 1897.
Usambara Baboon Tarantula

Image Credits: Thefridayspider.files.wordpress.com, I.pinimg.com, Arachnoboards.com, Photobucket.com, Deviantart.com, Mikebasictarantula.com

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