Home / Jumping Spiders / Red Back Jumping Spider (Phidippus johnsoni)

Red Back Jumping Spider (Phidippus johnsoni)

Red Back Jumping Spider is a species of very common American spiders, and is the most populated among all the jumping spider species in its range. It gets its name for the red coloration on the dorsal side of its rounded abdomen, and for its natural tendency to move by jumping from place to place.

Red Back Jumping Spider

Scientific Classification

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Approximate length is ¾ of an inch, but tend to vary greatly between individuals.

Color: Both male and female possess a bright red abdomen, with the female having a central black stripe as sexual dimorphism.

Other Characteristic Features: Redback jumping spiders build tubular silk nests and remain inside their homes during nighttime or bad weather conditions.

Red Back Jumping Spider Size

Eggs

After a successful mating, the female has the ability to store sperm within its body, and use it for up to 2 years for laying multiple batches of eggs. It can lay eggs every 25 to 30 days, depending upon the season. Each egg sac can contain anything between 40 and 300 eggs. However, the recorded number of eggs in a sac is almost 5000.

Spiderlings

After being laid, it takes almost two weeks for the eggs to hatch. The young spiders leave their maternal web by being carried on the wind. They eventually grow up and make their independent webs.

How Poisonous is the Red-backed Jumping Spider

The redback jumping spider is neither dangerous, nor is its venom toxic to humans. At the most, a bite may result in pain and some local swelling at the site that might last for a few days. However, if bacterial infections occur around the site, it should not be left untreated.

Male Red Back Jumping Spider

Quick Facts

Lifespan About a year (average)
Distribution Western regions of North America surrounded by the Great Plains, the Pacific Ocean, northern Mexico, and southern Canada
Habitat Prefer living under rocks, woods, on the ground, and are also seen in grape vines
Common predators Birds, lizards and other reptiles
Diet A variety of insects including flies, bugs and moth caterpillars and adults, as also other spiders
Red Back Jumping Spider Picture

Did You Know

  • In 2012, NASA sent a specimen red-backed jumping spider into space.
  • While performing a dancing ritual prior to mating, some males are reported to produce a sound by twitching their abdomens.

Image Credits: Hmrprint.com, Animalcorner.co.uk, Spiderid.com, Nathistoc.bio.uci.edu

Red Back Jumping Spider is a species of very common American spiders, and is the most populated among all the jumping spider species in its range. It gets its name for the red coloration on the dorsal side of its rounded abdomen, and for its natural tendency to move by jumping from place to place.

Red Back Jumping Spider

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Approximate length is ¾ of an inch, but tend to vary greatly between individuals.

Color: Both male and female possess a bright red abdomen, with the female having a central black stripe as sexual dimorphism.

Other Characteristic Features: Redback jumping spiders build tubular silk nests and remain inside their homes during nighttime or bad weather conditions.

Red Back Jumping Spider Size

Eggs

After a successful mating, the female has the ability to store sperm within its body, and use it for up to 2 years for laying multiple batches of eggs. It can lay eggs every 25 to 30 days, depending upon the season. Each egg sac can contain anything between 40 and 300 eggs. However, the recorded number of eggs in a sac is almost 5000.

Spiderlings

After being laid, it takes almost two weeks for the eggs to hatch. The young spiders leave their maternal web by being carried on the wind. They eventually grow up and make their independent webs.

How Poisonous is the Red-backed Jumping Spider

The redback jumping spider is neither dangerous, nor is its venom toxic to humans. At the most, a bite may result in pain and some local swelling at the site that might last for a few days. However, if bacterial infections occur around the site, it should not be left untreated.

Male Red Back Jumping Spider

Quick Facts

Lifespan About a year (average)
Distribution Western regions of North America surrounded by the Great Plains, the Pacific Ocean, northern Mexico, and southern Canada
Habitat Prefer living under rocks, woods, on the ground, and are also seen in grape vines
Common predators Birds, lizards and other reptiles
Diet A variety of insects including flies, bugs and moth caterpillars and adults, as also other spiders
Red Back Jumping Spider Picture

Did You Know

  • In 2012, NASA sent a specimen red-backed jumping spider into space.
  • While performing a dancing ritual prior to mating, some males are reported to produce a sound by twitching their abdomens.

Image Credits: Hmrprint.com, Animalcorner.co.uk, Spiderid.com, Nathistoc.bio.uci.edu

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *