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Thwaitesia

The Thwaitesia genus occurs in the tropical regions throughout the world, comprising 22 species.

Thwaitesia Spider

Spiders Belonging To This Genus

Thwaitesia affinis Thwaitesia algerica Thwaitesia argentata
Thwaitesia argenteoguttata Thwaitesia argenteosquamata Mirror (Thwaitesia argentiopunctata)
Thwaitesia aureosignata Thwaitesia bracteata Thwaitesia dangensis
Thwaitesia glabicauda Thwaitesia inaurata Thwaitesia margaritifera
Thwaitesia meruensis Thwaitesia nigronodosa Thwaitesia phoenicolegna
Thwaitesia pulcherrima Thwaitesia rhomboidalis Thwaitesia scintillans
Thwaitesia simoni Thwaitesia spinicauda Thwaitesia splendida
Thwaitesia turbinata

Physical Description & Identification

Adults

Size: Females of certain species of this genus like the Thwaitesia bracteata, and Thwaitesia affinisare approximately 4.5 mm (0.17 inches) in length, while the males are 2.7 mm (0.10 inches) long.

Color: The colors vary from one species tothe other. For example, the Thwaitesia argentiopunctata (Mirror) is silver with green, cream, red, and yellow abdomen.

Other Characteristic Features: Different spiders show various features. The Thwaitesia argentiopunctata (Mirror) has mirror-like scales on its back.

Eggs

The silken sac has about 30 eggs.

Spiderlings

There are not many details about the juvenile spiders, though, like most other spiderlings, they also move to dwell independently in a couple of days after maturation.

The Web

Though there is not much information in this regard, spiders of this genus presumably make tangle space webs as they are a part of the cobweb spider family.

Are Species of the Thwaitesia Genus Poisonous and Do They Bite

There is insufficient information about the venom of the species of this genus alongside their impact on humans.

Quick Facts

Lifespan Approximately 1 year
Distribution Tropical regions of the world
Habitat Leaves and trees
Diet Insects

Did You Know

  • This genus has a similarity to the Spintharus and Episinus of the Theridiidae family.

Image Credits: arachne.org.au

The Thwaitesia genus occurs in the tropical regions throughout the world, comprising 22 species.

Thwaitesia Spider

Spiders Belonging To This Genus

Thwaitesia affinis Thwaitesia algerica Thwaitesia argentata
Thwaitesia argenteoguttata Thwaitesia argenteosquamata Mirror (Thwaitesia argentiopunctata)
Thwaitesia aureosignata Thwaitesia bracteata Thwaitesia dangensis
Thwaitesia glabicauda Thwaitesia inaurata Thwaitesia margaritifera
Thwaitesia meruensis Thwaitesia nigronodosa Thwaitesia phoenicolegna
Thwaitesia pulcherrima Thwaitesia rhomboidalis Thwaitesia scintillans
Thwaitesia simoni Thwaitesia spinicauda Thwaitesia splendida
Thwaitesia turbinata

Physical Description & Identification

Adults

Size: Females of certain species of this genus like the Thwaitesia bracteata, and Thwaitesia affinisare approximately 4.5 mm (0.17 inches) in length, while the males are 2.7 mm (0.10 inches) long.

Color: The colors vary from one species tothe other. For example, the Thwaitesia argentiopunctata (Mirror) is silver with green, cream, red, and yellow abdomen.

Other Characteristic Features: Different spiders show various features. The Thwaitesia argentiopunctata (Mirror) has mirror-like scales on its back.

Eggs

The silken sac has about 30 eggs.

Spiderlings

There are not many details about the juvenile spiders, though, like most other spiderlings, they also move to dwell independently in a couple of days after maturation.

The Web

Though there is not much information in this regard, spiders of this genus presumably make tangle space webs as they are a part of the cobweb spider family.

Are Species of the Thwaitesia Genus Poisonous and Do They Bite

There is insufficient information about the venom of the species of this genus alongside their impact on humans.

Quick Facts

Lifespan Approximately 1 year
Distribution Tropical regions of the world
Habitat Leaves and trees
Diet Insects

Did You Know

  • This genus has a similarity to the Spintharus and Episinus of the Theridiidae family.

Image Credits: arachne.org.au

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