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Tiger (Linothele fallax)

The tiger spider belongs to the less-researched genus, Linothele. Not a single species of the genus is well known by scientists.

Scientific Classification

  • Family: Dipluridae
  • Genus: Linothele
  • Scientific name: Linothele fallax

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: The supposedly big species could be around 0.59 in (1.5 cm).

Color: Black body with orange stripes on the abdomen, similar to tiger stripes.

Other Characteristic Features: The legs are extremely long.

Tiger Spider

Eggs

It is still under research how the species procreate.

Spiderlings

There is no information as far as the young tiger spiders are concerned.

The Web

They are believed to make messy webs but it is not proven.

Are Tiger Spiders Venomous

There is no data showcasing that these spiders have venomous, but it is best to stay away from such big spiders.

Quick Facts

Distribution Brazil
Habitat Crevices, leaf litters, and tree barks
Diet Insects
Lifespan Unknown
IUCN Conservation Status Not listed

Did You Know

The species belong to the genus that was discovered by a German arachnologist,  Ferdinand Karsch.

Image Cedits: Featuredcreature.com

The tiger spider belongs to the less-researched genus, Linothele. Not a single species of the genus is well known by scientists.

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: The supposedly big species could be around 0.59 in (1.5 cm).

Color: Black body with orange stripes on the abdomen, similar to tiger stripes.

Other Characteristic Features: The legs are extremely long.

Tiger Spider

Eggs

It is still under research how the species procreate.

Spiderlings

There is no information as far as the young tiger spiders are concerned.

The Web

They are believed to make messy webs but it is not proven.

Are Tiger Spiders Venomous

There is no data showcasing that these spiders have venomous, but it is best to stay away from such big spiders.

Quick Facts

Distribution Brazil
Habitat Crevices, leaf litters, and tree barks
Diet Insects
Lifespan Unknown
IUCN Conservation Status Not listed

Did You Know

The species belong to the genus that was discovered by a German arachnologist,  Ferdinand Karsch.

Image Cedits: Featuredcreature.com

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