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Fringed Jumping (Portia fimbriata)

The fringed jumping spider of the jumping spider family is native to Southeast Asia and Australia. Like most other members of the Portia genus, these spiders are also known for their versatile hunting techniques.

Fringed Jumping Spider

Scientific Classification

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Females are 0.26 – 0.41 inches (0.66 – 1.0 cm) while males are 0.20 – 0.25 inches (0.50 – 0.63 cm) .

Color: The males and females are closely similar when it comes to coloration. They have a dark brown carapace, with reddish-brown fangs. Their undersides and palps appear brown with white hairs on the latter. The abdomen is also dark brown, marked with spots of white.

A change in coloration is observed in spiders from Indonesia and New Guinea, which have an orangish-brown carapace, and a yellow abdomen.

Other Characteristic Features: The male and female spiders have long legs with a fringed pattern, resulting in their name.

Eggs

They usually lay eggs either on dry, brown leaves, 2cm long, or even on silken sacs located on the horizontal web that is a part of the main web.

Spiderlings

Many eggs are eaten by the mother itself so not all of them make it to adulthood. Those who hatch and survive, reach the adulthood stage through several molting phases.

The Web

Female spiders build webs sizing 4,000 cubic cm (volume-wise), suspended from rocks or branches.

Are Fringed Jumping Spiders Venomous

The fringed jumping spider is not venomous, but its bite can cause swelling, and redness, particularly in people allergic to spiders.

Fringed Jumping Spider Size

Quick Facts

Distribution Australia, Malaysia, Sri Lanka
Habitat Rainforests and savanna woodlands
Diet Small insects, eggs of other spiders
Web Type Funnel-shaped
Predators Frogs, mantises, birds, and ants
Lifespan Around 1.5 years
IUCN Conservation Status Not listed

Did You Know

  • One Portia fimbrata that the Australian Museum houses at present was found developing its lost limb in seven days after molting.
  • Carl Ludwig Doleschall described this species for the first time in 1859.

Image Credits: Live.staticflickr.com, Media.bowerbird.org.au

The fringed jumping spider of the jumping spider family is native to Southeast Asia and Australia. Like most other members of the Portia genus, these spiders are also known for their versatile hunting techniques.

Fringed Jumping Spider

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Females are 0.26 – 0.41 inches (0.66 – 1.0 cm) while males are 0.20 – 0.25 inches (0.50 – 0.63 cm) .

Color: The males and females are closely similar when it comes to coloration. They have a dark brown carapace, with reddish-brown fangs. Their undersides and palps appear brown with white hairs on the latter. The abdomen is also dark brown, marked with spots of white.

A change in coloration is observed in spiders from Indonesia and New Guinea, which have an orangish-brown carapace, and a yellow abdomen.

Other Characteristic Features: The male and female spiders have long legs with a fringed pattern, resulting in their name.

Eggs

They usually lay eggs either on dry, brown leaves, 2cm long, or even on silken sacs located on the horizontal web that is a part of the main web.

Spiderlings

Many eggs are eaten by the mother itself so not all of them make it to adulthood. Those who hatch and survive, reach the adulthood stage through several molting phases.

The Web

Female spiders build webs sizing 4,000 cubic cm (volume-wise), suspended from rocks or branches.

Are Fringed Jumping Spiders Venomous

The fringed jumping spider is not venomous, but its bite can cause swelling, and redness, particularly in people allergic to spiders.

Fringed Jumping Spider Size

Quick Facts

Distribution Australia, Malaysia, Sri Lanka
Habitat Rainforests and savanna woodlands
Diet Small insects, eggs of other spiders
Web Type Funnel-shaped
Predators Frogs, mantises, birds, and ants
Lifespan Around 1.5 years
IUCN Conservation Status Not listed

Did You Know

  • One Portia fimbrata that the Australian Museum houses at present was found developing its lost limb in seven days after molting.
  • Carl Ludwig Doleschall described this species for the first time in 1859.

Image Credits: Live.staticflickr.com, Media.bowerbird.org.au

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