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Fringed Jumping (Portia fimbriata)

The fringed jumping spider is a predatory species mostly preying on other spiders. Some of them are good stalkers as well. While showdown is a common thing between such spiders, some winners prefer to kill the loser and eat their eggs, while some just leave the losers.

Scientific Classification

Fringed Jumping Spider

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Females are 0.26-0.41 in (0.66-1.0 cm) while males are 0.20-0.25 in (0.50-0.63 cm)

Color: Spiders that are found in Taiwan and Australia showcase deep brown carapace and palps. The palps have white hairs. The underside is brown and the chelicerae and jaw are deep brown. There are pale marking and hair throughout the body. Male spiders’ cephalothorax is partly covered with white rings.

Other Characteristic Features: Hair is clustered over the body so that they can camouflage

Eggs

They usually lay eggs either on dry leaves or silk egg sacs located on the horizontal web that is a part of the main web.

Spiderlings

Many eggs are eaten by the mother itself so not all of them make it to adulthood. Those who hatch and survive, reach the adulthood stage through different molting.

The Web

Female spiders build webs sizing 4,000 cubic cm (volume-wise), suspending from rocks or branches.

Are Fringed Jumping Spiders Venomous

The fringed jumping spider is not venomous, but its bite can irritate people who have spider allergy. The bite often leaves a red mark on the skin.

Fringed Jumping Spider Size

Quick Facts

Distribution Australia, Malaysia, Sri Lanka
Habitat Rainforests and savanna woodlands
Diet Other spiders and their eggs, insects
Web Type Funnel-shaped
Predators Frogs, mantises, birds, and ants
Lifespan Around 1.5 years
IUCN Conservation Status Not listed

Did You Know

  • This spider can redevelop its lost limb around 7 days post molting.
  • This is considered to be an extremely intelligent spider that learns new tricks while predating and able to embrace useful ways.

Image Credits: Live.staticflickr.com, Media.bowerbird.org.au

The fringed jumping spider is a predatory species mostly preying on other spiders. Some of them are good stalkers as well. While showdown is a common thing between such spiders, some winners prefer to kill the loser and eat their eggs, while some just leave the losers.

Fringed Jumping Spider

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Females are 0.26-0.41 in (0.66-1.0 cm) while males are 0.20-0.25 in (0.50-0.63 cm)

Color: Spiders that are found in Taiwan and Australia showcase deep brown carapace and palps. The palps have white hairs. The underside is brown and the chelicerae and jaw are deep brown. There are pale marking and hair throughout the body. Male spiders’ cephalothorax is partly covered with white rings.

Other Characteristic Features: Hair is clustered over the body so that they can camouflage

Eggs

They usually lay eggs either on dry leaves or silk egg sacs located on the horizontal web that is a part of the main web.

Spiderlings

Many eggs are eaten by the mother itself so not all of them make it to adulthood. Those who hatch and survive, reach the adulthood stage through different molting.

The Web

Female spiders build webs sizing 4,000 cubic cm (volume-wise), suspending from rocks or branches.

Are Fringed Jumping Spiders Venomous

The fringed jumping spider is not venomous, but its bite can irritate people who have spider allergy. The bite often leaves a red mark on the skin.

Fringed Jumping Spider Size

Quick Facts

Distribution Australia, Malaysia, Sri Lanka
Habitat Rainforests and savanna woodlands
Diet Other spiders and their eggs, insects
Web Type Funnel-shaped
Predators Frogs, mantises, birds, and ants
Lifespan Around 1.5 years
IUCN Conservation Status Not listed

Did You Know

  • This spider can redevelop its lost limb around 7 days post molting.
  • This is considered to be an extremely intelligent spider that learns new tricks while predating and able to embrace useful ways.

Image Credits: Live.staticflickr.com, Media.bowerbird.org.au

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