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Fringed Jumping Spider (Portia fimbriata): Facts, Identification and Pictures Fringed Jumping Spider (Portia fimbriata): Facts, Identification and Pictures
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Fringed Jumping (Portia fimbriata)

The fringed jumping spider is a cool spider from Southeast Asia and Australia. It’s part of the jumping spider family. What’s special about it? This spider is super smart when it comes to catching its food! We’ve got some exciting things to tell you about this spider right here!

Scientific Classification

Fringed Jumping Spider

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

  • Size: Females are 0.26 – 0.41 inches (0.66 – 1.0 cm) while males are 0.20 – 0.25 inches (0.50 – 0.63 cm).
  • Color: The males and females are closely similar when it comes to coloration. They have a dark brown carapace, with reddish-brown fangs. Their undersides and palps appear brown with white hairs on the latter. The abdomen is also dark brown, marked with spots of white.A change in coloration is observed in spiders from Indonesia and New Guinea, which have an orangish-brown carapace, and a yellow abdomen.
  • Other Characteristic Features: The male and female spiders have long legs with a fringed pattern, resulting in their name.

Eggs

They usually lay eggs either on dry, brown leaves, 2cm long, or even on silken sacs located on the horizontal web that is a part of the main web.

Spiderlings

Many eggs are eaten by the mother itself so not all of them make it to adulthood. Those who hatch and survive, reach the adulthood stage through several molting phases.

The Web

Female spiders build webs sizing 4,000 cubic cm (volume-wise), suspended from rocks or branches.

Fringed Jumping Web

Are Fringed Jumping Spiders Venomous?

Yes, Fringed Jumping spiders have venom. They use it to snatch up the tiny bugs they like to eat. But for humans, it’s not very powerful.

Can Fringed Jumping Spiders Bite?

They can bite if they’re bothered. The bite might feel like a little pinch, but most people don’t think it’s too bad. Kindly note that its bite can cause swelling and redness.

Fringed Jumping Spider Size

Ecological Importance and Behavior of Fringed Jumping Spider

The fringed jumping spider plays a pivotal role in its ecosystem, controlling the population of small insects and other spider species through predation. Their unique hunting strategies, which include mimicking prey and using their web as a tool, showcase their intelligence and adaptability.

Natural Predator: They face threats from various predators, including frogs, mantises, birds, and ants, which contribute to the balance within their ecological community.

Prey-Predator Dynamics: The fringed jumping spider exists in a delicate balance within its habitat, serving as both predator and prey. This dynamic is crucial for maintaining ecological stability and ensuring biodiversity.

Relationship with Humans: Discovered by Carl Ludwig Doleschall in 1859, this species has since fascinated scientists and the public alike. Their venom is not a significant threat to humans, and their presence underscores the richness of life within rainforests and savanna woodlands.

Fringed Jumping Female

Quick Facts

DistributionAustralia, Malaysia, Sri Lanka
HabitatRainforests and savanna woodlands
DietSmall insects, eggs of other spiders
Web TypeFunnel-shaped
PredatorsFrogs, mantises, birds, and ants
LifespanAround 1.5 years
IUCN Conservation StatusNot listed

Did You Know

  • One Portia fimbrata that the Australian Museum houses at present was found developing its lost limb seven days after molting.
  • Carl Ludwig Doleschall described this species for the first time in 1859.

Fringed Jumping Image

In summary, the fringed jumping spider, Portia fimbriata, is a testament to the complexity and marvels of the arachnid world.

The fringed jumping spider is a cool spider from Southeast Asia and Australia. It’s part of the jumping spider family. What’s special about it? This spider is super smart when it comes to catching its food! We’ve got some exciting things to tell you about this spider right here!

Fringed Jumping Spider

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

  • Size: Females are 0.26 – 0.41 inches (0.66 – 1.0 cm) while males are 0.20 – 0.25 inches (0.50 – 0.63 cm).
  • Color: The males and females are closely similar when it comes to coloration. They have a dark brown carapace, with reddish-brown fangs. Their undersides and palps appear brown with white hairs on the latter. The abdomen is also dark brown, marked with spots of white.A change in coloration is observed in spiders from Indonesia and New Guinea, which have an orangish-brown carapace, and a yellow abdomen.
  • Other Characteristic Features: The male and female spiders have long legs with a fringed pattern, resulting in their name.

Eggs

They usually lay eggs either on dry, brown leaves, 2cm long, or even on silken sacs located on the horizontal web that is a part of the main web.

Spiderlings

Many eggs are eaten by the mother itself so not all of them make it to adulthood. Those who hatch and survive, reach the adulthood stage through several molting phases.

The Web

Female spiders build webs sizing 4,000 cubic cm (volume-wise), suspended from rocks or branches.

Fringed Jumping Web

Are Fringed Jumping Spiders Venomous?

Yes, Fringed Jumping spiders have venom. They use it to snatch up the tiny bugs they like to eat. But for humans, it’s not very powerful.

Can Fringed Jumping Spiders Bite?

They can bite if they’re bothered. The bite might feel like a little pinch, but most people don’t think it’s too bad. Kindly note that its bite can cause swelling and redness.

Fringed Jumping Spider Size

Ecological Importance and Behavior of Fringed Jumping Spider

The fringed jumping spider plays a pivotal role in its ecosystem, controlling the population of small insects and other spider species through predation. Their unique hunting strategies, which include mimicking prey and using their web as a tool, showcase their intelligence and adaptability.

Natural Predator: They face threats from various predators, including frogs, mantises, birds, and ants, which contribute to the balance within their ecological community.

Prey-Predator Dynamics: The fringed jumping spider exists in a delicate balance within its habitat, serving as both predator and prey. This dynamic is crucial for maintaining ecological stability and ensuring biodiversity.

Relationship with Humans: Discovered by Carl Ludwig Doleschall in 1859, this species has since fascinated scientists and the public alike. Their venom is not a significant threat to humans, and their presence underscores the richness of life within rainforests and savanna woodlands.

Fringed Jumping Female

Quick Facts

DistributionAustralia, Malaysia, Sri Lanka
HabitatRainforests and savanna woodlands
DietSmall insects, eggs of other spiders
Web TypeFunnel-shaped
PredatorsFrogs, mantises, birds, and ants
LifespanAround 1.5 years
IUCN Conservation StatusNot listed

Did You Know

  • One Portia fimbrata that the Australian Museum houses at present was found developing its lost limb seven days after molting.
  • Carl Ludwig Doleschall described this species for the first time in 1859.

Fringed Jumping Image

In summary, the fringed jumping spider, Portia fimbriata, is a testament to the complexity and marvels of the arachnid world.