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Magnificent (Ordgarius magnificus)

Magnificent spider of the orb-weaver family is one among the two species of the ordgarius genus categorized as bolas spiders because of its silk-spinning technique to catch prey.

Magnificent Spider

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size:  Females have a body length of 0.55 inches (14 mm) while males are shorter, being 0.07 inches (2mm) long.

Scientific Classification

Color: The females possess a creamy-white body with a yellow and pink spotted appearance. Parts of their head have shades of white and red. The males, on the other hand, do not have a distinct coloration.

Other Characteristic Features: They have tubercles or rounded projections on their head. Their body and legs possess long, fine hairs.

Eggs

They have a 1.96 inches (0.05 mm) long egg sac with an individual spider producing approximately nine of them every season. There are about hundreds of small, round eggs in a single sac.

Spiderlings

They go through several molts before attaining maturation.

The Web

Belonging to the group of bolas spiders, they do not spin circular webs like the other species or the orb-weaver family. Instead, these spiders spin a sticky, silken globule-like structure known as bolas, which they throw upon their prey to get hold of them.

Magnificent Spider Web

Are The Magnificent Spiders Venomous

Their venom is harmless and they rarely bite humans.

Quick Facts

DistributionIn New South Wales and Queensland of Australia 
HabitatTrees, as well as tall shrubs that do not have a height of more than 2m above the ground level
DietMoths, flies, butterflies, and pests
LifespanApproximately 1 year

Did You Know

  • The hairs on its legs are vibration-sensitive, indicating the spider about the presence of a moth in its vicinity.
  • They exhibit the aggressive mimicry technique to bring in their prey close to them. The females mimic the scent of the female moth through the airborne pheromone present in the sticky silk globule to attract the male moths.

Image Source: Ih1.redbubble.net, Live.staticflickr.com

Magnificent spider of the orb-weaver family is one among the two species of the ordgarius genus categorized as bolas spiders because of its silk-spinning technique to catch prey.

Magnificent Spider

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size:  Females have a body length of 0.55 inches (14 mm) while males are shorter, being 0.07 inches (2mm) long.

Color: The females possess a creamy-white body with a yellow and pink spotted appearance. Parts of their head have shades of white and red. The males, on the other hand, do not have a distinct coloration.

Other Characteristic Features: They have tubercles or rounded projections on their head. Their body and legs possess long, fine hairs.

Eggs

They have a 1.96 inches (0.05 mm) long egg sac with an individual spider producing approximately nine of them every season. There are about hundreds of small, round eggs in a single sac.

Spiderlings

They go through several molts before attaining maturation.

The Web

Belonging to the group of bolas spiders, they do not spin circular webs like the other species or the orb-weaver family. Instead, these spiders spin a sticky, silken globule-like structure known as bolas, which they throw upon their prey to get hold of them.

Magnificent Spider Web

Are The Magnificent Spiders Venomous

Their venom is harmless and they rarely bite humans.

Quick Facts

DistributionIn New South Wales and Queensland of Australia 
HabitatTrees, as well as tall shrubs that do not have a height of more than 2m above the ground level
DietMoths, flies, butterflies, and pests
LifespanApproximately 1 year

Did You Know

  • The hairs on its legs are vibration-sensitive, indicating the spider about the presence of a moth in its vicinity.
  • They exhibit the aggressive mimicry technique to bring in their prey close to them. The females mimic the scent of the female moth through the airborne pheromone present in the sticky silk globule to attract the male moths.

Image Source: Ih1.redbubble.net, Live.staticflickr.com

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