Menemerus

This genus is a prominent part of jumping genus family with variable abdomen patterns. For example, some have round, or some have oval abdomens.

Menemerus

Spiders Belonging to this Genus

M. affinisM. albocinctusM. animatus
M. arabicusM. bicolorM. bifurcus
M. bivittatusM. brachygnathusM. brevibulbis
M. carliniM. congoensisM. cummingorum
M. davidiM. depressusM. desertus
M. dimidiusM. eburnensisM. errabundus
M. fageiM. falsificusM. fasciculatus
M. felixM. formosusM. fulvus
M. guttatusM. illigeriM. kochi
M. legalliM. legendreiM. lesnei
M. lessertiM. magnificusM. marginalis
M. marginatusM. meridionalisM. minshullae
M. mirabilisM. modestusM. namibicus
M. natalisM. nigeriensisM. nigli
M. ochraceusM. pallescensM. paradoxus
M. patellarisM. pentamaculatusM. pilosus
M. placidusM. plenusM. proximus
M. pulcherM. rabaudiM. regius
M. rubicundusM. sabulosusM. schutzae
M. semilimbatusM. silverM. soldani
M. taeniatusM. transvaalicusM. tropicus
M. utilisM. verneiM. wuchangensis
M. zimbabwensis  

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: The spiders are 0.16-0.39 in (0.40-0.99 cm).

Color: Most of the species have a brown and gray body.

Other Characteristic Features: Their body is covered with hairs.

Eggs

All the species of this genus lay 25-40 eggs in a silken sac.

Spiderlings

After around 3 weeks, spiderlings come out of their safe and secured sac.

The Web

These spiders are mainly hunters by nature, so they don’t need to make web, some species might make some silken retreat for reposing, but those can’t be the called webs.

Are Spiders of Menemerus Genus Venomous

The species are yet to be studied further, so, nothing specifically can be said so far, but this is also true that jumping spiders are not fatally venomous for humans.

Quick Facts

DistributionSenegal, Cuba, Algeria, China, Namibia, Tunisia, China, and many other African countries
HabitatTrees, bushes, and leaf litters
DietInsects
Lifespan1-2 years

Did You Know

  • The famous naturalist, Eugène Louis Simon described the big genus in 1868.

Image Source: Upload.wikimedia.org

This genus is a prominent part of jumping genus family with variable abdomen patterns. For example, some have round, or some have oval abdomens.

Menemerus

Spiders Belonging to this Genus

M. affinisM. albocinctusM. animatus
M. arabicusM. bicolorM. bifurcus
M. bivittatusM. brachygnathusM. brevibulbis
M. carliniM. congoensisM. cummingorum
M. davidiM. depressusM. desertus
M. dimidiusM. eburnensisM. errabundus
M. fageiM. falsificusM. fasciculatus
M. felixM. formosusM. fulvus
M. guttatusM. illigeriM. kochi
M. legalliM. legendreiM. lesnei
M. lessertiM. magnificusM. marginalis
M. marginatusM. meridionalisM. minshullae
M. mirabilisM. modestusM. namibicus
M. natalisM. nigeriensisM. nigli
M. ochraceusM. pallescensM. paradoxus
M. patellarisM. pentamaculatusM. pilosus
M. placidusM. plenusM. proximus
M. pulcherM. rabaudiM. regius
M. rubicundusM. sabulosusM. schutzae
M. semilimbatusM. silverM. soldani
M. taeniatusM. transvaalicusM. tropicus
M. utilisM. verneiM. wuchangensis
M. zimbabwensis  

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: The spiders are 0.16-0.39 in (0.40-0.99 cm).

Color: Most of the species have a brown and gray body.

Other Characteristic Features: Their body is covered with hairs.

Eggs

All the species of this genus lay 25-40 eggs in a silken sac.

Spiderlings

After around 3 weeks, spiderlings come out of their safe and secured sac.

The Web

These spiders are mainly hunters by nature, so they don’t need to make web, some species might make some silken retreat for reposing, but those can’t be the called webs.

Are Spiders of Menemerus Genus Venomous

The species are yet to be studied further, so, nothing specifically can be said so far, but this is also true that jumping spiders are not fatally venomous for humans.

Quick Facts

DistributionSenegal, Cuba, Algeria, China, Namibia, Tunisia, China, and many other African countries
HabitatTrees, bushes, and leaf litters
DietInsects
Lifespan1-2 years

Did You Know

  • The famous naturalist, Eugène Louis Simon described the big genus in 1868.

Image Source: Upload.wikimedia.org

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