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Cardinal Jumping (Phidippus cardinalis)

Cardinal Jumping or Cardinal Jumper, as commonly called, is a part of the Salticidae family. They are indigenous to different parts of North America.

Cardinal Jumping Spider

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: They are overall small, with the females being slightly bigger than their male counterparts.

Color: These species have a red carapace with two black bands on their dorsal abdomen, alongside black, hairy legs.

Other Characteristic Features: They have an oval-shaped carapace and hairy legs. 

Eggs

A single sac may have about a hundred eggs that are small and round.

Spiderlings

Though adequate information about the spiderlings remains unavailable, the juvenile mostly disperses from their family upon maturation.

The Web

Like most other spiders of their family, they, too, do not spin webs but use silken threads to capture prey.

Are Cardinal Jumpers Venomous

The venom in their fangs is not harmful to humans.

Quick Facts

Other NamesCardinal jumper 
DistributionParts of North America
PredatorsFlies, crickets, fruit flies, roaches
DietSmall insects, as well as other spiders
LifespanApproximately 1 year

Did You Know

  • They are among the several jumping spider species to mimic mutillid wasps of the Dasymutilla genus known for their painful sting.
  • Their small size and velvet appearance earn them the name velvet ants.

Image Source: Static.inaturalist.org

Cardinal Jumping or Cardinal Jumper, as commonly called, is a part of the Salticidae family. They are indigenous to different parts of North America.

Cardinal Jumping Spider

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: They are overall small, with the females being slightly bigger than their male counterparts.

Color: These species have a red carapace with two black bands on their dorsal abdomen, alongside black, hairy legs.

Other Characteristic Features: They have an oval-shaped carapace and hairy legs. 

Eggs

A single sac may have about a hundred eggs that are small and round.

Spiderlings

Though adequate information about the spiderlings remains unavailable, the juvenile mostly disperses from their family upon maturation.

The Web

Like most other spiders of their family, they, too, do not spin webs but use silken threads to capture prey.

Are Cardinal Jumpers Venomous

The venom in their fangs is not harmful to humans.

Quick Facts

Other NamesCardinal jumper 
DistributionParts of North America
PredatorsFlies, crickets, fruit flies, roaches
DietSmall insects, as well as other spiders
LifespanApproximately 1 year

Did You Know

  • They are among the several jumping spider species to mimic mutillid wasps of the Dasymutilla genus known for their painful sting.
  • Their small size and velvet appearance earn them the name velvet ants.

Image Source: Static.inaturalist.org

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