Phidippus

This genus, including around 60 species, is a group of jumping spiders with bright iridescent shades all over the body. There used to be more species in the genus, but further scientific research has placed them elsewhere.

Phidippus Spider

Spiders Belonging to this Genus

Phidippus adonis Phidippus adumbratus Phidippus amans
Phidippus albulatus Phidippus apacheanus Phidippus ardens
Phidippus arizonensis Phidippus asotus Bold Jumping (Phidippus audax)
Phidippus aureus Phidippus bidentatus Phidippus boei
Phidippus borealis Phidippus californicus Phidippus cardinalis
Phidippus carneus Phidippus carolinensis Phidippus cerberus
Phidippus clarus Phidippus comatus Phidippus concinnus
Phidippus cruentus Phidippus cryptus Phidippus dianthus
Phidippus felinus Phidippus georgii Phidippus insignarius
Red Back Jumping Spider (Phidippus johnsoni) Phidippus kastoni Phidippus lynceus
Phidippus maddisoni Phidippus mimicus Phidippus morpheus
Phidippus mystaceus Phidippus nikites Phidippus octopunctatus
Phidippus olympus Phidippus otiosus Phidippus phoenix
Phidippus pius Phidippus pompatus Phidippus princeps
Phidippus pruinosus Phidippus pulcherrimus Phidippus purpuratus
Phidippus putnami Regal Jumping (Phidippus regius) Phidippus richmani
Phidippus texanus Phidippus tigris Phidippus toro
Phidippus tux Phidippus tyrannus Phidippus tyrrelli
Phidippus ursulus Phidippus venus Phidippus vexans
Phidippus whitmani Phidippus workmani Phidippus zethus

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Since there are plenty of species, so the size ranges from 0.23 in (0.58 cm) to 0.98 in (2.48 cm). Males are always smaller than female spiders.

Color: The body of these spiders is brightly colored with black, green, orange, or any other dark shade. The iridescent hair of the body is often tinged with royal blue or peacock green shade.

Other Characteristic Features: The entire body and legs are deeply hairy.

Eggs

Female spiders lay their eggs in a sac. Some species carry the eggs along with them, while some do die after laying the eggs.

Spiderlings

After hatching, spiderlings either stay with their mother for a few days and then get dispersed, or they detach themselves from the beginning. This depends and varies from one species to another.

The Web

The jumping spiders do not make webs for their predation; instead, they jump and chase down their victims.

Are Spiders of Phidippus Genus Venomous

Even though some of the spiders do have venom, they are not harmful enough to kill humans. In some cases, humans might face allergic reactions, swelling, and redness of the skin, but anything more severe than this is unlikely to happen.

Quick Facts

Distribution North America
Habitat Open grasslands
Diet Insects
Web Type Silky, made for laying eggs or hiding for a short period
Lifespan 1-2 years

Did You Know

  • The name of the genus in Greek indicates a person who “spares the horses”.
  • The name is inspired by a Celtic character of the same name. He used to be a slave and a physician at the same time to the then king Deiotaros.

Image Credits: bugguide.net

This genus, including around 60 species, is a group of jumping spiders with bright iridescent shades all over the body. There used to be more species in the genus, but further scientific research has placed them elsewhere.

Phidippus Spider

Spiders Belonging to this Genus

Phidippus adonis Phidippus adumbratus Phidippus amans
Phidippus albulatus Phidippus apacheanus Phidippus ardens
Phidippus arizonensis Phidippus asotus Bold Jumping (Phidippus audax)
Phidippus aureus Phidippus bidentatus Phidippus boei
Phidippus borealis Phidippus californicus Phidippus cardinalis
Phidippus carneus Phidippus carolinensis Phidippus cerberus
Phidippus clarus Phidippus comatus Phidippus concinnus
Phidippus cruentus Phidippus cryptus Phidippus dianthus
Phidippus felinus Phidippus georgii Phidippus insignarius
Red Back Jumping Spider (Phidippus johnsoni) Phidippus kastoni Phidippus lynceus
Phidippus maddisoni Phidippus mimicus Phidippus morpheus
Phidippus mystaceus Phidippus nikites Phidippus octopunctatus
Phidippus olympus Phidippus otiosus Phidippus phoenix
Phidippus pius Phidippus pompatus Phidippus princeps
Phidippus pruinosus Phidippus pulcherrimus Phidippus purpuratus
Phidippus putnami Regal Jumping (Phidippus regius) Phidippus richmani
Phidippus texanus Phidippus tigris Phidippus toro
Phidippus tux Phidippus tyrannus Phidippus tyrrelli
Phidippus ursulus Phidippus venus Phidippus vexans
Phidippus whitmani Phidippus workmani Phidippus zethus

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Since there are plenty of species, so the size ranges from 0.23 in (0.58 cm) to 0.98 in (2.48 cm). Males are always smaller than female spiders.

Color: The body of these spiders is brightly colored with black, green, orange, or any other dark shade. The iridescent hair of the body is often tinged with royal blue or peacock green shade.

Other Characteristic Features: The entire body and legs are deeply hairy.

Eggs

Female spiders lay their eggs in a sac. Some species carry the eggs along with them, while some do die after laying the eggs.

Spiderlings

After hatching, spiderlings either stay with their mother for a few days and then get dispersed, or they detach themselves from the beginning. This depends and varies from one species to another.

The Web

The jumping spiders do not make webs for their predation; instead, they jump and chase down their victims.

Are Spiders of Phidippus Genus Venomous

Even though some of the spiders do have venom, they are not harmful enough to kill humans. In some cases, humans might face allergic reactions, swelling, and redness of the skin, but anything more severe than this is unlikely to happen.

Quick Facts

Distribution North America
Habitat Open grasslands
Diet Insects
Web Type Silky, made for laying eggs or hiding for a short period
Lifespan 1-2 years

Did You Know

  • The name of the genus in Greek indicates a person who “spares the horses”.
  • The name is inspired by a Celtic character of the same name. He used to be a slave and a physician at the same time to the then king Deiotaros.

Image Credits: bugguide.net

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