Phidippus

Phiddipus genus of the jumping spider family has about 60 species as of the 2004 records. Most species occupy different parts of North America.

Phidippus Spider

Spiders Belonging to this Genus

Phidippus adonis Phidippus adumbratus Phidippus amans
Phidippus albulatus Phidippus apacheanus Phidippus ardens
Phidippus arizonensis Phidippus asotus Bold Jumping (Phidippus audax)
Phidippus aureus Phidippus bidentatus Phidippus boei
Phidippus borealis Phidippus californicus Phidippus cardinalis
Phidippus carneus Phidippus carolinensis Phidippus cerberus
Phidippus clarus Phidippus comatus Phidippus concinnus
Phidippus cruentus Phidippus cryptus Phidippus dianthus
Phidippus felinus Phidippus georgii Phidippus insignarius
Red Back Jumping Spider (Phidippus johnsoni) Phidippus kastoni Phidippus lynceus
Phidippus maddisoni Phidippus mimicus Phidippus morpheus
Phidippus mystaceus Phidippus nikites Phidippus octopunctatus
Phidippus olympus Phidippus otiosus Phidippus phoenix
Phidippus pius Phidippus pompatus Phidippus princeps
Phidippus pruinosus Phidippus pulcherrimus Phidippus purpuratus
Phidippus putnami Regal Jumping (Phidippus regius) Phidippus richmani
Phidippus texanus Phidippus tigris Phidippus toro
Phidippus tux Phidippus tyrannus Phidippus tyrrelli
Phidippus ursulus Phidippus venus Phidippus vexans
Phidippus whitmani Phidippus workmani Phidippus zethus

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: The size ranges from 0.23 inches (0.58 cm) to 0.98 inches (2.48 cm), with the males being smaller than their female counterparts.

Scientific Classification

Color: They are mostly black, green, or orange, with some species having peacock green or royal blue hairs.

Other Characteristic Features: Most spiders of this genus has a hairy appearance. Bold jumper (Phidippus audax) have distinct markings on their abdomen.

Eggs

The pale white eggs are oval-shaped. The females of Phidippus clarus lays about 135 eggs in a single clutch.

Spiderlings

Even after the egg membrane sheds, the hatchlings mature within the cocoon. The spiderlings leave their protective shell two or three days after the first molt. They do not start hunting right after hatching but stay in their den for a certain period that could span from two hours to a few days. Approximately 10% of them make retreats during this time, while most do so after feeding.

The Web

The jumping spiders do not make webs for their predation; instead, they jump and chase down their victims.

Are Spiders of the Phidippus Genus Venomous

Even though some of the spiders do have venom, they are not harmful enough to kill humans. In some cases, they might result in allergic reactions, swelling, and redness of the skin, but anything more severe than this is unlikely to happen.

Quick Facts

Distribution North America
Habitat Open grasslands
Diet Insects
Web Type Silky, made for laying eggs or hiding for a short period
Lifespan 1 – 2 years

Did You Know

  • The name of the genus in Greek indicates a person who “spares the horses”. It derives inspiration from the Celtic character of a slave named Phidippus, who was also king Deiotarus’ physician.

Image Credits: bugguide.net

Phiddipus genus of the jumping spider family has about 60 species as of the 2004 records. Most species occupy different parts of North America.

Phidippus Spider

Spiders Belonging to this Genus

Phidippus adonis Phidippus adumbratus Phidippus amans
Phidippus albulatus Phidippus apacheanus Phidippus ardens
Phidippus arizonensis Phidippus asotus Bold Jumping (Phidippus audax)
Phidippus aureus Phidippus bidentatus Phidippus boei
Phidippus borealis Phidippus californicus Phidippus cardinalis
Phidippus carneus Phidippus carolinensis Phidippus cerberus
Phidippus clarus Phidippus comatus Phidippus concinnus
Phidippus cruentus Phidippus cryptus Phidippus dianthus
Phidippus felinus Phidippus georgii Phidippus insignarius
Red Back Jumping Spider (Phidippus johnsoni) Phidippus kastoni Phidippus lynceus
Phidippus maddisoni Phidippus mimicus Phidippus morpheus
Phidippus mystaceus Phidippus nikites Phidippus octopunctatus
Phidippus olympus Phidippus otiosus Phidippus phoenix
Phidippus pius Phidippus pompatus Phidippus princeps
Phidippus pruinosus Phidippus pulcherrimus Phidippus purpuratus
Phidippus putnami Regal Jumping (Phidippus regius) Phidippus richmani
Phidippus texanus Phidippus tigris Phidippus toro
Phidippus tux Phidippus tyrannus Phidippus tyrrelli
Phidippus ursulus Phidippus venus Phidippus vexans
Phidippus whitmani Phidippus workmani Phidippus zethus

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: The size ranges from 0.23 inches (0.58 cm) to 0.98 inches (2.48 cm), with the males being smaller than their female counterparts.

Color: They are mostly black, green, or orange, with some species having peacock green or royal blue hairs.

Other Characteristic Features: Most spiders of this genus has a hairy appearance. Bold jumper (Phidippus audax) have distinct markings on their abdomen.

Eggs

The pale white eggs are oval-shaped. The females of Phidippus clarus lays about 135 eggs in a single clutch.

Spiderlings

Even after the egg membrane sheds, the hatchlings mature within the cocoon. The spiderlings leave their protective shell two or three days after the first molt. They do not start hunting right after hatching but stay in their den for a certain period that could span from two hours to a few days. Approximately 10% of them make retreats during this time, while most do so after feeding.

The Web

The jumping spiders do not make webs for their predation; instead, they jump and chase down their victims.

Are Spiders of the Phidippus Genus Venomous

Even though some of the spiders do have venom, they are not harmful enough to kill humans. In some cases, they might result in allergic reactions, swelling, and redness of the skin, but anything more severe than this is unlikely to happen.

Quick Facts

Distribution North America
Habitat Open grasslands
Diet Insects
Web Type Silky, made for laying eggs or hiding for a short period
Lifespan 1 – 2 years

Did You Know

  • The name of the genus in Greek indicates a person who “spares the horses”. It derives inspiration from the Celtic character of a slave named Phidippus, who was also king Deiotarus’ physician.

Image Credits: bugguide.net

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