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Zebra (Salticus scenicus)

The Zebra Spider, also called Zebra Jumping Spider, is a species from the northern hemisphere. Like other jumping spider species, they do not build a web to catch prey, but instead, are adapted to chance predation by waiting patiently for unsuspecting prey and then suddenly jump on them to capture. They get their name from the zebra-like black and white contrasting coloration.

Scientific Classification

Zebra Spider

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: The females are 5-7 mm long, whereas the males are 5-6 mm in length.

Color: Striped in black and white

Other Characteristic Features: Before mating, the males of the species perform a dramatic courtship dance by waving the front legs, alongside displacing its abdomen up and down. The better a male can dance the more likely it is for the female to agree for copulation, while success is guaranteed if the male can display a perfect shuffle.

Zebra Spider Size

Eggs

The female spider stays with its egg sac or a silk cocoon in which the eggs are protected. It continues to guard the young ones even after they hatch.

Spiderlings

Accurate information regarding the number of offspring and the time between egg deposition and independence of the zebra jumping spiders is not yet known by the scientists. The baby spiders develop inside an egg sac, which is generally hidden under a rock. As the spiderlings undergo their second molt, they become independent of their mother and begin living by themselves. The males of the species attain sexual maturity before their female counterparts.

Zebra Spider Baby

How Poisonous is the Zebra Jumping Spider

These spiders are not at all harmful to humans. They will not inflict a bite unless they feel threatened or are provoked. If bitten, only a mild irritation can be experienced by the victim. Its venom is not dangerous to humans and might only give symptoms like a mild irritation.

Zebra Spider Bite
Zebra Jumping Spider

Quick Facts

Lifespan Typical longevity in the wild is 1 to 2 years, whereas, in captivity, it is 2 to 3
Distribution Found throughout the Holarctic, but widespread across  Britain, Europe, and North America
Habitat In the outdoors, they are found on the walls, plants, and trees, fences, especially on sunny days; in the indoors, they can be located on window sill corners behind curtains
Common predators Spider wasps and mantises are the known predators
Diet Insects, terrestrial and non-insect arthropods
Zebra Spider Picture

Did You Know

  • The zebra jumping spider gets its generic name Salticus from the Latin word for ‘dancing’ as a reference to the dancing skills in the male, while its specific name scenicus comes from a Greek word meaning a decorative place or a theatrical, which refers to its dramatic coloration.
  • This spider is one of the few insects that exhibit awareness of humans. If an individual throws a look at this spider, it is often seen raising its head, along with some behavioral changes.
Zebra Spider Image

Image Credits: Cambridgeblog.org, Domyown.com, Images.immediate.co.uk, Bugguide.net, 98kupd.com, C1.staticflickr.com,
Cdn.domyown.com

The Zebra Spider, also called Zebra Jumping Spider, is a species from the northern hemisphere. Like other jumping spider species, they do not build a web to catch prey, but instead, are adapted to chance predation by waiting patiently for unsuspecting prey and then suddenly jump on them to capture. They get their name from the zebra-like black and white contrasting coloration.

Zebra Spider

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: The females are 5-7 mm long, whereas the males are 5-6 mm in length.

Color: Striped in black and white

Other Characteristic Features: Before mating, the males of the species perform a dramatic courtship dance by waving the front legs, alongside displacing its abdomen up and down. The better a male can dance the more likely it is for the female to agree for copulation, while success is guaranteed if the male can display a perfect shuffle.

Zebra Spider Size

Eggs

The female spider stays with its egg sac or a silk cocoon in which the eggs are protected. It continues to guard the young ones even after they hatch.

Spiderlings

Accurate information regarding the number of offspring and the time between egg deposition and independence of the zebra jumping spiders is not yet known by the scientists. The baby spiders develop inside an egg sac, which is generally hidden under a rock. As the spiderlings undergo their second molt, they become independent of their mother and begin living by themselves. The males of the species attain sexual maturity before their female counterparts.

Zebra Spider Baby

How Poisonous is the Zebra Jumping Spider

These spiders are not at all harmful to humans. They will not inflict a bite unless they feel threatened or are provoked. If bitten, only a mild irritation can be experienced by the victim. Its venom is not dangerous to humans and might only give symptoms like a mild irritation.

Zebra Spider Bite
Zebra Jumping Spider

Quick Facts

Lifespan Typical longevity in the wild is 1 to 2 years, whereas, in captivity, it is 2 to 3
Distribution Found throughout the Holarctic, but widespread across  Britain, Europe, and North America
Habitat In the outdoors, they are found on the walls, plants, and trees, fences, especially on sunny days; in the indoors, they can be located on window sill corners behind curtains
Common predators Spider wasps and mantises are the known predators
Diet Insects, terrestrial and non-insect arthropods
Zebra Spider Picture

Did You Know

  • The zebra jumping spider gets its generic name Salticus from the Latin word for ‘dancing’ as a reference to the dancing skills in the male, while its specific name scenicus comes from a Greek word meaning a decorative place or a theatrical, which refers to its dramatic coloration.
  • This spider is one of the few insects that exhibit awareness of humans. If an individual throws a look at this spider, it is often seen raising its head, along with some behavioral changes.
Zebra Spider Image

Image Credits: Cambridgeblog.org, Domyown.com, Images.immediate.co.uk, Bugguide.net, 98kupd.com, C1.staticflickr.com,
Cdn.domyown.com

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