Home / Jumping Spiders / Phidippus californicus

Phidippus californicus

Phidippus californicus is a member of the family of jumping spiders. They are found in North America and are often found in the same environment as other jumping spiders like Phidippus apacheanus and Phidippus octopunctatus.

Scientific Classification

Phidippus californicus

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Male: 0.7-1.1 cm (0.27-0.43 in) Female: 1.2 cm (0.47 in)

Color: Their bodies and limbs are black, with bluish-green mouthparts and a bright red abdomen with a black stripe running through its middle. There are two tiny white spots between the red and black parts of the abdomen.

Other Characteristic Features: They mimic mutilid wasps as a form of aposematism, deterring predators from eating them.

Eggs

Female spiders lay 2-3 successive batches of eggs, with each consecutive clutch containing fewer eggs. Around 40 spiderlings emerge from the first, 30 from the second, and very few from the third batch of eggs.

Spiderlings

Spiderlings are brownish-gray with a red abdomen covered with various markings. They hatch after 3 weeks and become self-sufficient after the first molt takes two weeks.

The Web

Phidippus californicus do not use webbing for hunting their prey, instead pouncing when the opportune moment arises.

Is the Phidippus californicus Spider Venomous

A bite from this spider isn’t deadly, causing only mild swelling and redness.

Quick Facts

Lifespan 1-2 years
Distribution The southwestern United States (Arizona, California, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah) and northern Mexico (Baja California peninsula and Sonora)
Habitat Bushes on thin, stony soils including rabbitbrush, sagebrush, and the Four-winged saltbrush
Diet Insects like fruit flies and other spiders

Did You Know

  • The American entomologist husband wife duo George Williams Peckham and Elizabeth Maria Gifford Peckham first described this species in 1901.

Image Source: bugguide.net

Phidippus californicus is a member of the family of jumping spiders. They are found in North America and are often found in the same environment as other jumping spiders like Phidippus apacheanus and Phidippus octopunctatus.

Phidippus californicus

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Male: 0.7-1.1 cm (0.27-0.43 in) Female: 1.2 cm (0.47 in)

Color: Their bodies and limbs are black, with bluish-green mouthparts and a bright red abdomen with a black stripe running through its middle. There are two tiny white spots between the red and black parts of the abdomen.

Other Characteristic Features: They mimic mutilid wasps as a form of aposematism, deterring predators from eating them.

Eggs

Female spiders lay 2-3 successive batches of eggs, with each consecutive clutch containing fewer eggs. Around 40 spiderlings emerge from the first, 30 from the second, and very few from the third batch of eggs.

Spiderlings

Spiderlings are brownish-gray with a red abdomen covered with various markings. They hatch after 3 weeks and become self-sufficient after the first molt takes two weeks.

The Web

Phidippus californicus do not use webbing for hunting their prey, instead pouncing when the opportune moment arises.

Is the Phidippus californicus Spider Venomous

A bite from this spider isn’t deadly, causing only mild swelling and redness.

Quick Facts

Lifespan 1-2 years
Distribution The southwestern United States (Arizona, California, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah) and northern Mexico (Baja California peninsula and Sonora)
Habitat Bushes on thin, stony soils including rabbitbrush, sagebrush, and the Four-winged saltbrush
Diet Insects like fruit flies and other spiders

Did You Know

  • The American entomologist husband wife duo George Williams Peckham and Elizabeth Maria Gifford Peckham first described this species in 1901.

Image Source: bugguide.net

Comments are closed.