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Black House (Badumna insignis)

The Black House Spider, alternatively known as the common black spider is indigenous to Australia but also found in Japan as well as New Zealand.  Dark and robust in appearance, these are shy in nature and only come out of their nest to catch preys, retreating quickly on completing their task.

Scientific Classification

Black House Spider

Physical Description & Identification

Adults

Size: Like most other spiders the females having a size of about .70 inches (18mm) are larger than their male counterparts which grow up to (0.39 inches) 10mm.

Black House Spider Size

Color: Both sexes have a black body covered with thick velvety hair. Their legs and carapace are black or dark brown, while their abdomen is grey, marked with a dorsal pattern.

Eggs

The eggs are generally round in shape, contained in many white silk sacs. The mother stays close to the eggs, guarding them until maturation.

Black House Spider Egg Sac

Spiderlings

The spiderlings are small in size and remain in their mother’s web for a certain point of time before dispersing.

Black House Spiderlings

The Web 

The Black House spider has a messy web having a funnel-shaped retreat located either in the center or the corner where they spend most of their time waiting for their prey. Small objects or dust particles could be present in the web since the spiders never leave it unless compelled.

Black House Spider Web

Does the Black House Spider Bite and How Poisonous are They

These timid spiders hardly bite, but if they do it could be painful, causing the area to swell which then needs first aid. Other symptoms like giddiness, nausea, vomiting, and sweating have also been recorded. Multiple bites have also resulted in skin lesions, though in rare cases.

Though venomous, these spiders are not deadly, and their bite would not cause death.

Small Black House Spider

Quick Facts

Lifespan About 2 years after maturation, with females living longer
Distribution Southern and eastern parts of Australia as well as Japan and New Zealand
Habitat On rough-barked trees, inside buildings, near doorways, and windows
Common Predators White-tailed spider, parasitic wasps, flies
Diet Bees, butterflies, ants, beetles, flies

Big Black House Spider

Did You Know

  • Their close cousin, the grey house spider has a similar distribution, the only difference being that the latter can also be found in the United States.
  • Famous arachnologist, Ludwig Carl Christian Koch, described the Black House Spider in 1872.

Image Credits: Animalcorner.co.uk, Spiderzrule.com, Spiders.zacharoo.com, 1.bp.blogspot.com, Depestmasters.com.au,
Media.bowerbird.org.au, Images-wixmp.com

The Black House Spider, alternatively known as the common black spider is indigenous to Australia but also found in Japan as well as New Zealand.  Dark and robust in appearance, these are shy in nature and only come out of their nest to catch preys, retreating quickly on completing their task.

Black House Spider

Physical Description & Identification

Adults

Size: Like most other spiders the females having a size of about .70 inches (18mm) are larger than their male counterparts which grow up to (0.39 inches) 10mm.

Black House Spider Size

Color: Both sexes have a black body covered with thick velvety hair. Their legs and carapace are black or dark brown, while their abdomen is grey, marked with a dorsal pattern.

Eggs

The eggs are generally round in shape, contained in many white silk sacs. The mother stays close to the eggs, guarding them until maturation.

Black House Spider Egg Sac

Spiderlings

The spiderlings are small in size and remain in their mother’s web for a certain point of time before dispersing.

Black House Spiderlings

The Web 

The Black House spider has a messy web having a funnel-shaped retreat located either in the center or the corner where they spend most of their time waiting for their prey. Small objects or dust particles could be present in the web since the spiders never leave it unless compelled.

Black House Spider Web

Does the Black House Spider Bite and How Poisonous are They

These timid spiders hardly bite, but if they do it could be painful, causing the area to swell which then needs first aid. Other symptoms like giddiness, nausea, vomiting, and sweating have also been recorded. Multiple bites have also resulted in skin lesions, though in rare cases.

Though venomous, these spiders are not deadly, and their bite would not cause death.

Small Black House Spider

Quick Facts

Lifespan About 2 years after maturation, with females living longer
Distribution Southern and eastern parts of Australia as well as Japan and New Zealand
Habitat On rough-barked trees, inside buildings, near doorways, and windows
Common Predators White-tailed spider, parasitic wasps, flies
Diet Bees, butterflies, ants, beetles, flies

Big Black House Spider

Did You Know

  • Their close cousin, the grey house spider has a similar distribution, the only difference being that the latter can also be found in the United States.
  • Famous arachnologist, Ludwig Carl Christian Koch, described the Black House Spider in 1872.

Image Credits: Animalcorner.co.uk, Spiderzrule.com, Spiders.zacharoo.com, 1.bp.blogspot.com, Depestmasters.com.au,
Media.bowerbird.org.au, Images-wixmp.com

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