Home / Desidae Spiders / Grey House (Badumna longinqua)

Grey House (Badumna longinqua)

The grey house spider is a little researched species and a lot of studies are needed to describe this one. It has its origin in Eastern Australia but presently other countries have an abundance of this spider due to suitable climate and other thriving conditions. This is a nocturnal spider by nature.

Scientific Classification

Grey House Spider

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Females are around 0.59 in (1.4 cm) and males are smaller than them with an approximate size of 0.43 in (1.0 cm)

Color: Both the cephalothorax and the abdomen are pale gray with some spots on them. Legs have purplish-brown shade. Carpace is brown and it darkens towards the chelicerae.

Other Characteristic Features: The hairs on the legs are placed in a striped pattern, while one pair of eyes is one and a half times larger than other eyes.

Grey House Spider Size

Eggs

Nothing has been known for sure regarding the eggs of grey house spiders.

Spiderlings

Nothing has been known about juvenile grey house spiders.

The Web

The grey house spider makes webs and uses it as a trap for its preys. The webs are mostly found in uninterrupted places. Once a prey falls into the web, the spider injects venom, liquefy the body of the prey and then eats.

Grey House Spider Web

Are Grey House Spiders Venomous

It is not known if grey house spiders have venom that is detrimental for people or not. Whether they can bite if feels cornered, even that is not known.

Quick Facts

Other Name Gray spider
Distribution Eastern Australia,  New Zealand, South America, Uruguay, United States, Japan, Germany, Brazil, and Argentina
Habitat Wetlands, riparian forests, and grasslands. On leaves, rocks, walls, and tree trunks
Web Type Ladder like webs
Diet Moths, ants, bees, jumping plant lice, wasps, cicadas, and bumblebees
Lifespan 1-2 years (estimated)
Predators White-tailed spiders, long-bodied cellar spiders, New Zealand Short-Tailed Birds, flies, and parasitic wasps
IUCN Conservation Status Not listed

Did You Know

  • Male spiders leave their home searching for mates, while women can stay on her web throughout her life.

The grey house spider is a little researched species and a lot of studies are needed to describe this one. It has its origin in Eastern Australia but presently other countries have an abundance of this spider due to suitable climate and other thriving conditions. This is a nocturnal spider by nature.

Grey House Spider

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Females are around 0.59 in (1.4 cm) and males are smaller than them with an approximate size of 0.43 in (1.0 cm)

Color: Both the cephalothorax and the abdomen are pale gray with some spots on them. Legs have purplish-brown shade. Carpace is brown and it darkens towards the chelicerae.

Other Characteristic Features: The hairs on the legs are placed in a striped pattern, while one pair of eyes is one and a half times larger than other eyes.

Grey House Spider Size

Eggs

Nothing has been known for sure regarding the eggs of grey house spiders.

Spiderlings

Nothing has been known about juvenile grey house spiders.

The Web

The grey house spider makes webs and uses it as a trap for its preys. The webs are mostly found in uninterrupted places. Once a prey falls into the web, the spider injects venom, liquefy the body of the prey and then eats.

Grey House Spider Web

Are Grey House Spiders Venomous

It is not known if grey house spiders have venom that is detrimental for people or not. Whether they can bite if feels cornered, even that is not known.

Quick Facts

Other Name Gray spider
Distribution Eastern Australia,  New Zealand, South America, Uruguay, United States, Japan, Germany, Brazil, and Argentina
Habitat Wetlands, riparian forests, and grasslands. On leaves, rocks, walls, and tree trunks
Web Type Ladder like webs
Diet Moths, ants, bees, jumping plant lice, wasps, cicadas, and bumblebees
Lifespan 1-2 years (estimated)
Predators White-tailed spiders, long-bodied cellar spiders, New Zealand Short-Tailed Birds, flies, and parasitic wasps
IUCN Conservation Status Not listed

Did You Know

  • Male spiders leave their home searching for mates, while women can stay on her web throughout her life.

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