Drassodes

Drassodes is a genus of the ground spider family, with 162 species and one subspecies, according to the May 2019 records.

Drassodes

Spiders Belonging to the Genus

D. adisensisD. affinisD. afghanus
D. afghanusD. andamanensisD. andorranus
D. angulusD. arapensisD. archibensis
D. assimilatusD. astrologusD. auriculoides
D. auritusD. bechuanicusD. bendamiranus
D. bicurvatusD. bifidusD. brachythelis
D. braendegaardiD. caffrerianusD. calceatus
D. cambridgeiD. canaglensisD. carinivulvus
D. caspiusD. cerinusD. charcoviae
D. charitonoviD. chybyndensisD. clavifemur
D. crassipalpusD. cupaD. cupreus
D. cupreusD. dagestanusD. daliensis
D. daliensisD. deoprayagensisD. depilosus
D. deserticolaD. difficilisD. dispulsoides
D. distinctusD. dregeiD. drydeni
D. ellenaeD. ereptorD. falciger
D. fedtschenkoiD. fugaxD. gangeticus
D. giaD. gilvusD. gooldi
D. gosiutusD. gujaratensisD. hamiger
D. hebeiD. helenaeD. heterophthalmus
D. himalayensisD. ignobilisD. imbecillus
D. inermisD. infletusD. insignis
D. insidiatorD. interemptorD. interlisus
D. interpolatorD. involutusD. jakkabagensis
D. jiufengD. kaszabiD. katunensis
D. kibonotensisD. krausiD. kwantungensis
D. lacertosusD. lacertosusD. lapsus
D. licentiD. lindbergiD. lividus
D. longispinusD. lophognathusD. luridus
D. luteomicansD. lutescensD. lyratus
D. lyrigerD. macilentusD. malagassicus
D. mandibularisD. manducatorD. manducator
D. manducatorD. meghalayaensisD. mirus
D. montenegrinusD. monticolaD. nagqu
D. narayanpurensisD. nataliD. neglectus
D. noxD. nugatoriusD. obscurus
D. parauritusD. paroculusD. parvidens
D. pashanensisD. pashanensisD. pectinifer
D. phagduaensisD. placidulusD. platnicki
D. prosthesimiformisD. pseudolessertiD. pubescens
D. robatusD. rostratusD. rubicundulus
D. rubicundulusD. rugichelisD. russulus
D. saccatusD. saganusD. sagarensis
D. sagarensisD. sagarensisD. serratidens
D. sesquidentatusD. shawanensisD. shawanensis
D. similisD. simplexD. simplicivulvus
D. sirmourensisD. sitaeD. sockniensis
D. solitariusD. soussensisD. splendens
D. stationisD. sternatusD. striatus
D. subviduatusD. taehadongensisD. tarrhunensis
D. termeziusD. tesselatusD. thaleri
D. thimeiD. tikaderiD. tiritschensis
D. tortuosusD. unicolorD. uritai
D. venustusD. villosusD. viveki
D. vorax

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Their average size ranges from 0.15 – 0.46 inches (0.38 – 1.1 cm), though the length of a few spiders could go up to 0.79 inches (2 cm).

Scientific Classification

Color: They mostly come in shades of red, brown, and gray.

Other Characteristic Features: Most spiders have a hairy and stout appearance.

Eggs

The small, oval eggs remain within a thick-walled sac guarded by the females until they hatch.

Spiderlings

Though an accurate description of the spiderlings remains unrecorded, like most other juveniles, they too get on their own within a month from hatching.

The Web

They do not make a web before capturing their prey. Instead, these spiders hunt down insects, and in the process, they might use some silk to entangle them.

Are Spiders of the Drassodes Genus Venomous

They may bite in self-defense, but their venom is not harmful to humans.

Quick Facts

DistributionKenya, South Africa, Indonesia, Russia, Afghanistan, India, and Ukraine 
HabitatMostly in dry areas, under rocks, barks, and even leaves
DietInsects
Lifespan1 – 6 years

Did You Know

  • The genus was described in 1851 by the Swedish entomologist Niklas Westring.

Image Source: Alchetron.com

Drassodes is a genus of the ground spider family, with 162 species and one subspecies, according to the May 2019 records.

Drassodes

Spiders Belonging to the Genus

D. adisensisD. affinisD. afghanus
D. afghanusD. andamanensisD. andorranus
D. angulusD. arapensisD. archibensis
D. assimilatusD. astrologusD. auriculoides
D. auritusD. bechuanicusD. bendamiranus
D. bicurvatusD. bifidusD. brachythelis
D. braendegaardiD. caffrerianusD. calceatus
D. cambridgeiD. canaglensisD. carinivulvus
D. caspiusD. cerinusD. charcoviae
D. charitonoviD. chybyndensisD. clavifemur
D. crassipalpusD. cupaD. cupreus
D. cupreusD. dagestanusD. daliensis
D. daliensisD. deoprayagensisD. depilosus
D. deserticolaD. difficilisD. dispulsoides
D. distinctusD. dregeiD. drydeni
D. ellenaeD. ereptorD. falciger
D. fedtschenkoiD. fugaxD. gangeticus
D. giaD. gilvusD. gooldi
D. gosiutusD. gujaratensisD. hamiger
D. hebeiD. helenaeD. heterophthalmus
D. himalayensisD. ignobilisD. imbecillus
D. inermisD. infletusD. insignis
D. insidiatorD. interemptorD. interlisus
D. interpolatorD. involutusD. jakkabagensis
D. jiufengD. kaszabiD. katunensis
D. kibonotensisD. krausiD. kwantungensis
D. lacertosusD. lacertosusD. lapsus
D. licentiD. lindbergiD. lividus
D. longispinusD. lophognathusD. luridus
D. luteomicansD. lutescensD. lyratus
D. lyrigerD. macilentusD. malagassicus
D. mandibularisD. manducatorD. manducator
D. manducatorD. meghalayaensisD. mirus
D. montenegrinusD. monticolaD. nagqu
D. narayanpurensisD. nataliD. neglectus
D. noxD. nugatoriusD. obscurus
D. parauritusD. paroculusD. parvidens
D. pashanensisD. pashanensisD. pectinifer
D. phagduaensisD. placidulusD. platnicki
D. prosthesimiformisD. pseudolessertiD. pubescens
D. robatusD. rostratusD. rubicundulus
D. rubicundulusD. rugichelisD. russulus
D. saccatusD. saganusD. sagarensis
D. sagarensisD. sagarensisD. serratidens
D. sesquidentatusD. shawanensisD. shawanensis
D. similisD. simplexD. simplicivulvus
D. sirmourensisD. sitaeD. sockniensis
D. solitariusD. soussensisD. splendens
D. stationisD. sternatusD. striatus
D. subviduatusD. taehadongensisD. tarrhunensis
D. termeziusD. tesselatusD. thaleri
D. thimeiD. tikaderiD. tiritschensis
D. tortuosusD. unicolorD. uritai
D. venustusD. villosusD. viveki
D. vorax

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Their average size ranges from 0.15 – 0.46 inches (0.38 – 1.1 cm), though the length of a few spiders could go up to 0.79 inches (2 cm).

Color: They mostly come in shades of red, brown, and gray.

Other Characteristic Features: Most spiders have a hairy and stout appearance.

Eggs

The small, oval eggs remain within a thick-walled sac guarded by the females until they hatch.

Spiderlings

Though an accurate description of the spiderlings remains unrecorded, like most other juveniles, they too get on their own within a month from hatching.

The Web

They do not make a web before capturing their prey. Instead, these spiders hunt down insects, and in the process, they might use some silk to entangle them.

Are Spiders of the Drassodes Genus Venomous

They may bite in self-defense, but their venom is not harmful to humans.

Quick Facts

DistributionKenya, South Africa, Indonesia, Russia, Afghanistan, India, and Ukraine 
HabitatMostly in dry areas, under rocks, barks, and even leaves
DietInsects
Lifespan1 – 6 years

Did You Know

  • The genus was described in 1851 by the Swedish entomologist Niklas Westring.

Image Source: Alchetron.com

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