Drassodes

The genus, belonging to the ground spider family, is a big one. It has around 162 species and 1 subspecies.

Drassodes

Spiders Belonging to the Genus

D. adisensisD. affinisD. afghanus
D. afghanusD. andamanensisD. andorranus
D. angulusD. arapensisD. archibensis
D. assimilatusD. astrologusD. auriculoides
D. auritusD. bechuanicusD. bendamiranus
D. bicurvatusD. bifidusD. brachythelis
D. braendegaardiD. caffrerianusD. calceatus
D. cambridgeiD. canaglensisD. carinivulvus
D. caspiusD. cerinusD. charcoviae
D. charitonoviD. chybyndensisD. clavifemur
D. crassipalpusD. cupaD. cupreus
D. cupreusD. dagestanusD. daliensis
D. daliensisD. deoprayagensisD. depilosus
D. deserticolaD. difficilisD. dispulsoides
D. distinctusD. dregeiD. drydeni
D. ellenaeD. ereptorD. falciger
D. fedtschenkoiD. fugaxD. gangeticus
D. giaD. gilvusD. gooldi
D. gosiutusD. gujaratensisD. hamiger
D. hebeiD. helenaeD. heterophthalmus
D. himalayensisD. ignobilisD. imbecillus
D. inermisD. infletusD. insignis
D. insidiatorD. interemptorD. interlisus
D. interpolatorD. involutusD. jakkabagensis
D. jiufengD. kaszabiD. katunensis
D. kibonotensisD. krausiD. kwantungensis
D. lacertosusD. lacertosusD. lapsus
D. licentiD. lindbergiD. lividus
D. longispinusD. lophognathusD. luridus
D. luteomicansD. lutescensD. lyratus
D. lyrigerD. macilentusD. malagassicus
D. mandibularisD. manducatorD. manducator
D. manducatorD. meghalayaensisD. mirus
D. montenegrinusD. monticolaD. nagqu
D. narayanpurensisD. nataliD. neglectus
D. noxD. nugatoriusD. obscurus
D. parauritusD. paroculusD. parvidens
D. pashanensisD. pashanensisD. pectinifer
D. phagduaensisD. placidulusD. platnicki
D. prosthesimiformisD. pseudolessertiD. pubescens
D. robatusD. rostratusD. rubicundulus
D. rubicundulusD. rugichelisD. russulus
D. saccatusD. saganusD. sagarensis
D. sagarensisD. sagarensisD. serratidens
D. sesquidentatusD. shawanensisD. shawanensis
D. similisD. simplexD. simplicivulvus
D. sirmourensisD. sitaeD. sockniensis
D. solitariusD. soussensisD. splendens
D. stationisD. sternatusD. striatus
D. subviduatusD. taehadongensisD. tarrhunensis
D. termeziusD. tesselatusD. thaleri
D. thimeiD. tikaderiD. tiritschensis
D. tortuosusD. unicolorD. uritai
D. venustusD. villosusD. viveki
D. vorax

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Their average size range is 0.15-0.46 in (0.38-1.1 cm). They can be around 0.79 in long as well.

Color: Common shades are red, gray, and brown.

Other Characteristic Features: Legs are not slender, rather they look stout.

Eggs

Eggs are typically kept inside a sac.

Spiderlings

Spiderlings go on to live separately after a certain time.

The Web

They do not make web prior to capturing their prey, rather they hunt down insects and in the process they might use some silk to entangle the prey.

Are Spiders of Drassodes Genus Venomous

These spiders are not venomous but since a lot of studies is required about the genus, nothing can be said for sure.

Quick Facts

DistributionKenya, South Africa, Indonesia, Russia, Afghanistan, India, and Ukraine 
HabitatUnder leaves, trees
DietInsects
Lifespan1-6 years

Did You Know

  • The genus was described in 1851, by the Swedish entomologist, Niklas Westring.

Image Source: Alchetron.com

The genus, belonging to the ground spider family, is a big one. It has around 162 species and 1 subspecies.

Drassodes

Spiders Belonging to the Genus

D. adisensisD. affinisD. afghanus
D. afghanusD. andamanensisD. andorranus
D. angulusD. arapensisD. archibensis
D. assimilatusD. astrologusD. auriculoides
D. auritusD. bechuanicusD. bendamiranus
D. bicurvatusD. bifidusD. brachythelis
D. braendegaardiD. caffrerianusD. calceatus
D. cambridgeiD. canaglensisD. carinivulvus
D. caspiusD. cerinusD. charcoviae
D. charitonoviD. chybyndensisD. clavifemur
D. crassipalpusD. cupaD. cupreus
D. cupreusD. dagestanusD. daliensis
D. daliensisD. deoprayagensisD. depilosus
D. deserticolaD. difficilisD. dispulsoides
D. distinctusD. dregeiD. drydeni
D. ellenaeD. ereptorD. falciger
D. fedtschenkoiD. fugaxD. gangeticus
D. giaD. gilvusD. gooldi
D. gosiutusD. gujaratensisD. hamiger
D. hebeiD. helenaeD. heterophthalmus
D. himalayensisD. ignobilisD. imbecillus
D. inermisD. infletusD. insignis
D. insidiatorD. interemptorD. interlisus
D. interpolatorD. involutusD. jakkabagensis
D. jiufengD. kaszabiD. katunensis
D. kibonotensisD. krausiD. kwantungensis
D. lacertosusD. lacertosusD. lapsus
D. licentiD. lindbergiD. lividus
D. longispinusD. lophognathusD. luridus
D. luteomicansD. lutescensD. lyratus
D. lyrigerD. macilentusD. malagassicus
D. mandibularisD. manducatorD. manducator
D. manducatorD. meghalayaensisD. mirus
D. montenegrinusD. monticolaD. nagqu
D. narayanpurensisD. nataliD. neglectus
D. noxD. nugatoriusD. obscurus
D. parauritusD. paroculusD. parvidens
D. pashanensisD. pashanensisD. pectinifer
D. phagduaensisD. placidulusD. platnicki
D. prosthesimiformisD. pseudolessertiD. pubescens
D. robatusD. rostratusD. rubicundulus
D. rubicundulusD. rugichelisD. russulus
D. saccatusD. saganusD. sagarensis
D. sagarensisD. sagarensisD. serratidens
D. sesquidentatusD. shawanensisD. shawanensis
D. similisD. simplexD. simplicivulvus
D. sirmourensisD. sitaeD. sockniensis
D. solitariusD. soussensisD. splendens
D. stationisD. sternatusD. striatus
D. subviduatusD. taehadongensisD. tarrhunensis
D. termeziusD. tesselatusD. thaleri
D. thimeiD. tikaderiD. tiritschensis
D. tortuosusD. unicolorD. uritai
D. venustusD. villosusD. viveki
D. vorax

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Their average size range is 0.15-0.46 in (0.38-1.1 cm). They can be around 0.79 in long as well.

Color: Common shades are red, gray, and brown.

Other Characteristic Features: Legs are not slender, rather they look stout.

Eggs

Eggs are typically kept inside a sac.

Spiderlings

Spiderlings go on to live separately after a certain time.

The Web

They do not make web prior to capturing their prey, rather they hunt down insects and in the process they might use some silk to entangle the prey.

Are Spiders of Drassodes Genus Venomous

These spiders are not venomous but since a lot of studies is required about the genus, nothing can be said for sure.

Quick Facts

DistributionKenya, South Africa, Indonesia, Russia, Afghanistan, India, and Ukraine 
HabitatUnder leaves, trees
DietInsects
Lifespan1-6 years

Did You Know

  • The genus was described in 1851, by the Swedish entomologist, Niklas Westring.

Image Source: Alchetron.com

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