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Canopy Jumping (Phidippus otiosus)

Canopy Jumping spider of the Salticidae family is a tree-dwelling species, indigenous to the southeastern parts of North America. They have a close relation to other species of the Otiosus genus, namely the Phidippus regius, Phidippus pius, and Phidippus californicus.

Canopy Jumping Spider

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Females are about 0.62 inches (16mm), while the males are comparatively smaller.

Color: Their color could range from brown or white to gray and orange. These spiders have purple or green luminous fangs.

Other Characteristic Features: They have black tufts of hair on their body.

Eggs

The females lay eggs between December – February (South Carolina), and January – June (Florida). They remain in a silken sac under the oak or pine trees’ bark.

Spiderlings

The spiderlings mature by fall and eventually disperse to thrive independently.

The Web

Like other jumping spiders, they too do not spin webs but make silken retreats for hiding and catching prey.

Is the Canopy Jumping Spider Venomous

They are considered harmless to humans.

Quick Facts

DistributionIn the American states of Kentucky, Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, South Carolina, Virginia, Georgia, and Tennessee
HabitatMostly on trees
DietSmall insects
Lifespan10 -12 months

Did You Know

  • Their species name is a combination of Latin words “oto” and “osus” meaning peace and prone to, respectively. “Oto” in Ancient Greek also means black tufts of hair.

Image Source: Jaysnatureblog.files.wordpress.com

Canopy Jumping spider of the Salticidae family is a tree-dwelling species, indigenous to the southeastern parts of North America. They have a close relation to other species of the Otiosus genus, namely the Phidippus regius, Phidippus pius, and Phidippus californicus.

Canopy Jumping Spider

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Females are about 0.62 inches (16mm), while the males are comparatively smaller.

Color: Their color could range from brown or white to gray and orange. These spiders have purple or green luminous fangs.

Other Characteristic Features: They have black tufts of hair on their body.

Eggs

The females lay eggs between December – February (South Carolina), and January – June (Florida). They remain in a silken sac under the oak or pine trees’ bark.

Spiderlings

The spiderlings mature by fall and eventually disperse to thrive independently.

The Web

Like other jumping spiders, they too do not spin webs but make silken retreats for hiding and catching prey.

Is the Canopy Jumping Spider Venomous

They are considered harmless to humans.

Quick Facts

DistributionIn the American states of Kentucky, Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, South Carolina, Virginia, Georgia, and Tennessee
HabitatMostly on trees
DietSmall insects
Lifespan10 -12 months

Did You Know

  • Their species name is a combination of Latin words “oto” and “osus” meaning peace and prone to, respectively. “Oto” in Ancient Greek also means black tufts of hair.

Image Source: Jaysnatureblog.files.wordpress.com

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