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Regal Jumping Spider (Phidippus regius): Facts, Identification & Pictures Regal Jumping Spider (Phidippus regius): Facts, Identification & Pictures
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Regal Jumping (Phidippus regius)

The regal jumping spider is a cool member of the Salticidae family. Here’s a fun fact: the boy spiders look so much like black widows because of their color that people sometimes mix them up! Stick around, and we’ll share more awesome things about these jumpy spiders with you!

Scientific Classification

Regal Jumping

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

  • Size: Females are 0.28-0.87 in (0.7-2.2 cm) and males are 0.24-0.71 in (0.6-1.8 cm).
  • Color: Females are either orange or gray with some stripes and spots while males bear the same patterns but in white on their black bodies.
  • Other Characteristic Features: The chelicerae have a violet, purple, and green iridescence.
Regal Jumping Spider Size

Eggs

Usually, female spiders lay eggs four times in their lifetime and the first time the clutch size is around 200. The number of laying eggs decreases with time. All eggs are laid in silk cocoons under pine or oak tree barks.

Regal Jumping Spider Egg

Photo Credit: Lance Howard

Spiderlings

Not much is known about juvenile regal jumping spiders.

Regal Jumping Spiderling

The Web

These spiders make elliptic webs with two emergency exits on either side, but the webs are not for capturing prey, but rather for fostering their spiderlings and being able to fall back on the webs whenever they jump and miss a target.

Are Regal Jumping Spiders Venomous?

Yes, Regal Jumping Spiders have venom. But they mostly use it to catch tiny bugs they like to eat.

Can Regal Jumping Spiders Bite?

They can! If they’re bothered or feel cornered, they might bite. The jumping spider bites only when it is tightly held. It is not poisonous at all, but the bite might give a hurtful sensation that doesn’t last for more than a few minutes. 

Female Regal Jumping

Ecological Importance and Behavior of Regal Jumping Spider

Regal jumping spiders play a vital ecological role as biological control agents, feasting on a variety of insects that could otherwise become pests. Their behavior is characterized by their hunting strategy, which involves precise leaps to capture prey rather than spinning a web.

Natural Predators: Birds, lizards, and larger spiders are among the natural predators of the regal jumping spider. This predatory relationship is essential in controlling their population and maintaining ecological balance.

Prey-Predator Dynamics: The regal jumping spider’s ability to leap with accuracy allows them to be effective predators of insects, while also evading their own predators. This balance is crucial for the stability of the ecosystems in which they live.

Relationship with Humans: While their bite can be slightly painful, it poses no serious threat to humans. Regal jumping spiders are often welcomed in gardens and farms as they help control insect populations. Their impressive jumping skills have even made them subjects of curiosity.

Quick Facts

DistributionWest Indies, southeastern United States
HabitatWoodland and fields
Breeding SeasonMarch-September
DietInsects
Lifespan10 months
IUCN Conservation StatusNot Listed
Regal Jumping Spider

Did You Know

  • The regal jumping spider can jump on command if it is trained.

In summary, the regal jumping spider is not only a marvel of nature’s engineering but also a testament to the intricate web of life where each species, regardless of size, has a role to play. 

The regal jumping spider is a cool member of the Salticidae family. Here’s a fun fact: the boy spiders look so much like black widows because of their color that people sometimes mix them up! Stick around, and we’ll share more awesome things about these jumpy spiders with you!

Regal Jumping

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

  • Size: Females are 0.28-0.87 in (0.7-2.2 cm) and males are 0.24-0.71 in (0.6-1.8 cm).
  • Color: Females are either orange or gray with some stripes and spots while males bear the same patterns but in white on their black bodies.
  • Other Characteristic Features: The chelicerae have a violet, purple, and green iridescence.
Regal Jumping Spider Size

Eggs

Usually, female spiders lay eggs four times in their lifetime and the first time the clutch size is around 200. The number of laying eggs decreases with time. All eggs are laid in silk cocoons under pine or oak tree barks.

Regal Jumping Spider Egg

Photo Credit: Lance Howard

Spiderlings

Not much is known about juvenile regal jumping spiders.

Regal Jumping Spiderling

The Web

These spiders make elliptic webs with two emergency exits on either side, but the webs are not for capturing prey, but rather for fostering their spiderlings and being able to fall back on the webs whenever they jump and miss a target.

Are Regal Jumping Spiders Venomous?

Yes, Regal Jumping Spiders have venom. But they mostly use it to catch tiny bugs they like to eat.

Can Regal Jumping Spiders Bite?

They can! If they’re bothered or feel cornered, they might bite. The jumping spider bites only when it is tightly held. It is not poisonous at all, but the bite might give a hurtful sensation that doesn’t last for more than a few minutes. 

Female Regal Jumping

Ecological Importance and Behavior of Regal Jumping Spider

Regal jumping spiders play a vital ecological role as biological control agents, feasting on a variety of insects that could otherwise become pests. Their behavior is characterized by their hunting strategy, which involves precise leaps to capture prey rather than spinning a web.

Natural Predators: Birds, lizards, and larger spiders are among the natural predators of the regal jumping spider. This predatory relationship is essential in controlling their population and maintaining ecological balance.

Prey-Predator Dynamics: The regal jumping spider’s ability to leap with accuracy allows them to be effective predators of insects, while also evading their own predators. This balance is crucial for the stability of the ecosystems in which they live.

Relationship with Humans: While their bite can be slightly painful, it poses no serious threat to humans. Regal jumping spiders are often welcomed in gardens and farms as they help control insect populations. Their impressive jumping skills have even made them subjects of curiosity.

Quick Facts

DistributionWest Indies, southeastern United States
HabitatWoodland and fields
Breeding SeasonMarch-September
DietInsects
Lifespan10 months
IUCN Conservation StatusNot Listed
Regal Jumping Spider

Did You Know

  • The regal jumping spider can jump on command if it is trained.

In summary, the regal jumping spider is not only a marvel of nature’s engineering but also a testament to the intricate web of life where each species, regardless of size, has a role to play.