Home / Tarantulas / Antilles Pinktoe Tarantula (Caribena versicolor)

Antilles Pinktoe Tarantula (Caribena versicolor)

The Antilles Pinktoe Tarantula is a member of the genus Avicularia that is the most widespread group of spiders in the Americas, comprising of around 20 species. These spiders are extremely popular as pets especially because of their vibrant coloration, docile temperament, and very high longevity.

Antilles Pinktoe Tarantula

Scientific Classification

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: They are medium-sized spiders that grow around 4½ – 6 inches (11- 15 cm).

Color: The carapace turns green with adulthood, while the abdomen turns reddish and the legs begin to get green with pink tarsi, covered with purple hair that gives them their characteristic pinkish hue. Males are somewhat more brightly colored than females.

Other Characteristic Features: These tarantulas are arboreal (tree-dwelling). They spin intricate funnel webs in which they spend the majority of their lifetime.

Antilles Pinktoe Tarantula Size

Eggs

Like most other tarantulas, the eggs are protected in an egg sac that is guarded by the female under its abdomen until the baby spiders are ready to emerge.

Spiderlings

The spiderlings of this species spend most of the time with their mother until they are ready to separate and can independently hunt for their own food. The slings are metallic steel to bright blue with a black tree-trunk pattern on the abdomen. As they begin to age, they gradually lose their blue hue, getting their adult coloration.

Antilles Pinktoe Tarantula Spiderling

How Poisonous is the Antilles Pinktoe Tarantula

Although very docile and rarely bite, they do not prefer being handled much. Even if they bite, it is not poisonous and is no worse than a plain bee sting. Also, the body hairs can be somewhat irritating and can cause some itching and redness locally.

Antilles Pinktoe Tarantula Web

Quick Facts

Other Names Antilles Pink-toed Tarantula, Antilles Pink-toed Tree Spider, Martinique Red Tree Spider, Martinique Pinktoe
Lifespan Females can live for up to 12 years, while the males have a much shorter lifetime from 2 to 3 years
Distribution Native to the islands of Guadeloupe and Martinique in the Caribbean Sea, off the coast of South America
Habitat High up in the trees in funnel webs
Common predators Large reptiles and vertebrates including snakes, lizards, as well as some birds of prey
Diet Primarily insectivorous preying on especially flying insects including grasshoppers, roaches, adult crickets, wax moths, etc., as also some vertebrates like small lizards
Antilles Pinktoe Tarantula Habitat

Did You Know

  • Though they live in colonies in the wild, they are not as social in captivity.
  • Being very quick and agile, they can jump out or up to a distance of about 12 inches (30 cm).
Antilles Pinktoe Tarantula Sling
Antilles Pinktoe Tarantula Spider

Image Credits: Backwaterreptiles.com, I.pinimg.com, Kimballstock.com, I.imgur.com, Animal-world.com

The Antilles Pinktoe Tarantula is a member of the genus Avicularia that is the most widespread group of spiders in the Americas, comprising of around 20 species. These spiders are extremely popular as pets especially because of their vibrant coloration, docile temperament, and very high longevity.

Antilles Pinktoe Tarantula

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: They are medium-sized spiders that grow around 4½ – 6 inches (11- 15 cm).

Color: The carapace turns green with adulthood, while the abdomen turns reddish and the legs begin to get green with pink tarsi, covered with purple hair that gives them their characteristic pinkish hue. Males are somewhat more brightly colored than females.

Other Characteristic Features: These tarantulas are arboreal (tree-dwelling). They spin intricate funnel webs in which they spend the majority of their lifetime.

Antilles Pinktoe Tarantula Size

Eggs

Like most other tarantulas, the eggs are protected in an egg sac that is guarded by the female under its abdomen until the baby spiders are ready to emerge.

Spiderlings

The spiderlings of this species spend most of the time with their mother until they are ready to separate and can independently hunt for their own food. The slings are metallic steel to bright blue with a black tree-trunk pattern on the abdomen. As they begin to age, they gradually lose their blue hue, getting their adult coloration.

Antilles Pinktoe Tarantula Spiderling

How Poisonous is the Antilles Pinktoe Tarantula

Although very docile and rarely bite, they do not prefer being handled much. Even if they bite, it is not poisonous and is no worse than a plain bee sting. Also, the body hairs can be somewhat irritating and can cause some itching and redness locally.

Antilles Pinktoe Tarantula Web

Quick Facts

Other Names Antilles Pink-toed Tarantula, Antilles Pink-toed Tree Spider, Martinique Red Tree Spider, Martinique Pinktoe
Lifespan Females can live for up to 12 years, while the males have a much shorter lifetime from 2 to 3 years
Distribution Native to the islands of Guadeloupe and Martinique in the Caribbean Sea, off the coast of South America
Habitat High up in the trees in funnel webs
Common predators Large reptiles and vertebrates including snakes, lizards, as well as some birds of prey
Diet Primarily insectivorous preying on especially flying insects including grasshoppers, roaches, adult crickets, wax moths, etc., as also some vertebrates like small lizards
Antilles Pinktoe Tarantula Habitat

Did You Know

  • Though they live in colonies in the wild, they are not as social in captivity.
  • Being very quick and agile, they can jump out or up to a distance of about 12 inches (30 cm).
Antilles Pinktoe Tarantula Sling
Antilles Pinktoe Tarantula Spider

Image Credits: Backwaterreptiles.com, I.pinimg.com, Kimballstock.com, I.imgur.com, Animal-world.com

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