Warning: strpos() expects parameter 1 to be string, array given in /home/702414.cloudwaysapps.com/rmmdbvwrvr/public_html/wp-includes/blocks.php on line 20
Indian Ornamental Tarantula (Poecilotheria regalis): Facts, Identification & Pictures Indian Ornamental Tarantula (Poecilotheria regalis): Facts, Identification & Pictures
Home / Tarantulas / Indian Ornamental Tarantula (Poecilotheria regalis)

Indian Ornamental Tarantula (Poecilotheria regalis)

The Indian ornamental tarantula is a special kind of tarantula with a fancy name that comes from Greek and Latin words. These words mean “spotted wild beast” and “royal”. Curious about this regal spider? We’ve got some cool facts to share with you about it.

Scientific Classification

Indian Ornamental Tarantula

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

  • Size: They are fairly large, with a leg span of 7-8 cm (2.75-3.15 inches).

Indian Ornamental Tarantula Size

  • Color: Their bodies are grey, with their hind limbs maintaining a black and white alternating pattern. However, the forelimbs of this tarantula have a unique yellow coloration as well.
  • Other Characteristic Features: Males have an inner darker pattern absent in females.

Poecilotheria Regalis Male

Poecilotheria Regalis Female

Eggs

They are orange, and placed inside a sac made of webbing.

Spiderlings

The tiny spiderlings are orange and mature very quickly into adults.

The Web

These spiders make asymmetrical funnel webs.

Are Indian Ornamental Tarantulas Venomous?

Yes, Indian Ornamental Tarantulas have venom. They use it mostly to grab their meals. This spider is believed to have a medically significant bite that causes intense pain, though there haven’t been any instances of reported deaths or anaphylactic shock.

Can Indian Ornamental Tarantulas Bite?

They can bite, but they’re often calm creatures. If they feel threatened or scared, they might bite to defend themselves. However, they usually like to keep to themselves and enjoy their spider world.

Indian Ornamental Tree Spider

Ecological Importance and Behavior of Indian Ornamental Tarantula

This species is an important predator within its environment, feeding on various insects such as crickets and grasshoppers, thus maintaining the ecological balance by controlling pest populations.

Natural Predators: While the Indian Ornamental Tarantula is a formidable predator in its own right, it falls prey to larger animals such as birds, reptiles, and mammals that inhabit the same forested regions.

Prey-Predator Dynamics: The tarantula’s venom is a critical aspect of its hunting strategy, enabling it to immobilize prey swiftly. Its hunting style contributes to its role in the local food web as an efficient predator.

Relationship with Humans: Humans are both admirers and stewards of the Indian Ornamental Tarantula. While they are sought after as exotic pets by arachnid enthusiasts, their interaction with humans in the wild is minimal and typically non-aggressive. Bites to humans are rare and occur only when the spider feels directly threatened.

Quick Facts

Other namesIndian ornamental tree spider
LifespanMales: 3-5 years

Females: 11-12 years

DistributionSoutheastern India
HabitatTall trees
DietCrickets and grasshoppers

Indian Ornamental Tarantula Picture

Did You Know

  • British zoologist Reginald Innes Pocock F.R.S. first described this spider in 1899.
  • These tarantulas are popular pets among collectors and enthusiasts.

In conclusion, the Indian Ornamental Tarantula is an intricate part of its native ecosystem, contributing to insect population control and showcasing the diversity of India’s wildlife.

The Indian ornamental tarantula is a special kind of tarantula with a fancy name that comes from Greek and Latin words. These words mean “spotted wild beast” and “royal”. Curious about this regal spider? We’ve got some cool facts to share with you about it.

Indian Ornamental Tarantula

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

  • Size: They are fairly large, with a leg span of 7-8 cm (2.75-3.15 inches).

Indian Ornamental Tarantula Size

  • Color: Their bodies are grey, with their hind limbs maintaining a black and white alternating pattern. However, the forelimbs of this tarantula have a unique yellow coloration as well.
  • Other Characteristic Features: Males have an inner darker pattern absent in females.

Poecilotheria Regalis Male

Poecilotheria Regalis Female

Eggs

They are orange, and placed inside a sac made of webbing.

Spiderlings

The tiny spiderlings are orange and mature very quickly into adults.

The Web

These spiders make asymmetrical funnel webs.

Are Indian Ornamental Tarantulas Venomous?

Yes, Indian Ornamental Tarantulas have venom. They use it mostly to grab their meals. This spider is believed to have a medically significant bite that causes intense pain, though there haven’t been any instances of reported deaths or anaphylactic shock.

Can Indian Ornamental Tarantulas Bite?

They can bite, but they’re often calm creatures. If they feel threatened or scared, they might bite to defend themselves. However, they usually like to keep to themselves and enjoy their spider world.

Indian Ornamental Tree Spider

Ecological Importance and Behavior of Indian Ornamental Tarantula

This species is an important predator within its environment, feeding on various insects such as crickets and grasshoppers, thus maintaining the ecological balance by controlling pest populations.

Natural Predators: While the Indian Ornamental Tarantula is a formidable predator in its own right, it falls prey to larger animals such as birds, reptiles, and mammals that inhabit the same forested regions.

Prey-Predator Dynamics: The tarantula’s venom is a critical aspect of its hunting strategy, enabling it to immobilize prey swiftly. Its hunting style contributes to its role in the local food web as an efficient predator.

Relationship with Humans: Humans are both admirers and stewards of the Indian Ornamental Tarantula. While they are sought after as exotic pets by arachnid enthusiasts, their interaction with humans in the wild is minimal and typically non-aggressive. Bites to humans are rare and occur only when the spider feels directly threatened.

Quick Facts

Other namesIndian ornamental tree spider
LifespanMales: 3-5 years

Females: 11-12 years

DistributionSoutheastern India
HabitatTall trees
DietCrickets and grasshoppers

Indian Ornamental Tarantula Picture

Did You Know

  • British zoologist Reginald Innes Pocock F.R.S. first described this spider in 1899.
  • These tarantulas are popular pets among collectors and enthusiasts.

In conclusion, the Indian Ornamental Tarantula is an intricate part of its native ecosystem, contributing to insect population control and showcasing the diversity of India’s wildlife.