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Aphonopelma

The Aphonopelma belongs to the tarantula family, indigenous to parts of North America, Central America, and northern Mexico. The World Spider Catalog accepted 58 species of this genus as per the records of April 2019.

Aphonopelma Spider

Spiders Belonging To This Genus

Aphonopelma anax Aphonopelma anitahoffmannae Aphonopelma armada
Aphonopelma atomicum Aphonopelma belindae Aphonopelma bicoloratum
Aphonopelma burica Aphonopelma caniceps Aphonopelma catalina
Arizona Blond Tarantula (Aphonopelma chalcodes) Aphonopelma chiricahua Aphonopelma cookei
Aphonopelma crinirufum Aphonopelma crinitum Aphonopelma duplex
Aphonopelma eustathes Aphonopelma eutylenum Aphonopelma gabeli
Aphonopelma geotoma Aphonopelma gertschi Aphonopelma griseum
Aphonopelma hageni Aphonopelma helluo Texas Brown Tarantula (Aphonopelma hentzi)
Aphonopelma hesperum Aphonopelma icenoglei Aphonopelma iodius
Aphonopelma johnnycashi Aphonopelma joshua Aphonopelma latens
Aphonopelma levii Aphonopelma madera Aphonopelma mareki
Aphonopelma marxi Aphonopelma moderatum Aphonopelma moellendorfi
Aphonopelma mojave Aphonopelma mooreae Aphonopelma nayaritum
Aphonopelma pallidum Aphonopelma paloma Aphonopelma parvum
Aphonopelma peloncillo Aphonopelma phasmus Aphonopelma platnicki
Aphonopelma prenticei Aphonopelma prosoicum Aphonopelma ruedanum
Aphonopelma saguaro Aphonopelma sclerothrix Costa Rican Zebra Tarantula (Aphonopelma seemanni)
Aphonopelma serratum Aphonopelma steindachneri Aphonopelma superstitionense
Aphonopelma truncatum Aphonopelma vorhiesi Aphonopelma xanthochromum
Aphonopelma xwalxwal

Physical Description & Identification

Adults

Size: Most of them are about 14 cm to 15 cm (5.5 inches to 5.90 inches) long with a leg span of approximately 16 cm (6.29 inches).

Color: Most of them have a black or brown body and look similar.

Other Characteristic Features: Themajority of the species belonging to this genus has urticating hairs.

Eggs

The eggs, laid in burrows are protected by the mother.

Spiderlings

The spiderlings remain with their mother for a while after hatching.  Eventually, they move on to make burrows of their own.

The Web

They do not spin webs but guard the entrance of their homes with silk for capturing prey.

Are Spiders of the Aphonopelma Genus Venomous and Do They Bite

 Though fearful in appearance, they are not harmful to humans and bite when provoked.

Quick Facts

Lifespan Females: 20 to 40 years
Males: 5 to 15 years
Distribution North America, Central America, North Mexico
Habitat Grasslands, burrows, abandoned dens, and deserts
Predators Wasps, birds, snakes, coyotes, lizards
Diet Cockroach, beetle, mantise, grasshopper, and cricket

Did You Know

  • Aphonopelma makes up for 10% of the total species of the tarantula family described to date.
  • This genus had more species than their present numbers, but about 33 of them were rejected in the list published in 2016.
  • The taxonomic history of this genus that was first described by British zoologist Reginald I. Pocock is complicated.
  • Some species have gained popularity in the pet trade.

Image Credits: arachnoiden.com

The Aphonopelma belongs to the tarantula family, indigenous to parts of North America, Central America, and northern Mexico. The World Spider Catalog accepted 58 species of this genus as per the records of April 2019.

Aphonopelma Spider

Spiders Belonging To This Genus

Aphonopelma anax Aphonopelma anitahoffmannae Aphonopelma armada
Aphonopelma atomicum Aphonopelma belindae Aphonopelma bicoloratum
Aphonopelma burica Aphonopelma caniceps Aphonopelma catalina
Arizona Blond Tarantula (Aphonopelma chalcodes) Aphonopelma chiricahua Aphonopelma cookei
Aphonopelma crinirufum Aphonopelma crinitum Aphonopelma duplex
Aphonopelma eustathes Aphonopelma eutylenum Aphonopelma gabeli
Aphonopelma geotoma Aphonopelma gertschi Aphonopelma griseum
Aphonopelma hageni Aphonopelma helluo Texas Brown Tarantula (Aphonopelma hentzi)
Aphonopelma hesperum Aphonopelma icenoglei Aphonopelma iodius
Aphonopelma johnnycashi Aphonopelma joshua Aphonopelma latens
Aphonopelma levii Aphonopelma madera Aphonopelma mareki
Aphonopelma marxi Aphonopelma moderatum Aphonopelma moellendorfi
Aphonopelma mojave Aphonopelma mooreae Aphonopelma nayaritum
Aphonopelma pallidum Aphonopelma paloma Aphonopelma parvum
Aphonopelma peloncillo Aphonopelma phasmus Aphonopelma platnicki
Aphonopelma prenticei Aphonopelma prosoicum Aphonopelma ruedanum
Aphonopelma saguaro Aphonopelma sclerothrix Costa Rican Zebra Tarantula (Aphonopelma seemanni)
Aphonopelma serratum Aphonopelma steindachneri Aphonopelma superstitionense
Aphonopelma truncatum Aphonopelma vorhiesi Aphonopelma xanthochromum
Aphonopelma xwalxwal

Physical Description & Identification

Adults

Size: Most of them are about 14 cm to 15 cm (5.5 inches to 5.90 inches) long with a leg span of approximately 16 cm (6.29 inches).

Color: Most of them have a black or brown body and look similar.

Other Characteristic Features: Themajority of the species belonging to this genus has urticating hairs.

Eggs

The eggs, laid in burrows are protected by the mother.

Spiderlings

The spiderlings remain with their mother for a while after hatching.  Eventually, they move on to make burrows of their own.

The Web

They do not spin webs but guard the entrance of their homes with silk for capturing prey.

Are Spiders of the Aphonopelma Genus Venomous and Do They Bite

 Though fearful in appearance, they are not harmful to humans and bite when provoked.

Quick Facts

Lifespan Females: 20 to 40 years
Males: 5 to 15 years
Distribution North America, Central America, North Mexico
Habitat Grasslands, burrows, abandoned dens, and deserts
Predators Wasps, birds, snakes, coyotes, lizards
Diet Cockroach, beetle, mantise, grasshopper, and cricket

Did You Know

  • Aphonopelma makes up for 10% of the total species of the tarantula family described to date.
  • This genus had more species than their present numbers, but about 33 of them were rejected in the list published in 2016.
  • The taxonomic history of this genus that was first described by British zoologist Reginald I. Pocock is complicated.
  • Some species have gained popularity in the pet trade.

Image Credits: arachnoiden.com

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