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Phoneutria depilata

Phoneutria depilata is a spider belonging to the family of wandering spiders. It is endemic to Central America.

Phoneutria depilata

Scientific Classification

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: 10 cm

Color: They are brown, with stripes on their back and belly.

Other Characteristic Features: When threatened, these spiders will raise the first two pairs of limbs as a warning.

Eggs

The eggs are laid inside a sac made of webbing.

Spiderlings

After 28-34 days, the spiderlings emerge from the eggs.

The Web

Since these spiders are wandering hunters, they do not build elaborate webbing for catching prey.

Is the Phoneutria depilata Venomous

Like other spiders in its genus, they possess very potent venom. A bite from these spiders causes immense pain but is generally not fatal.

Quick Facts

Lifespan 1-2 years
Distribution Central America
Habitat Tropical forests
Diet Amphibians, mice, and reptiles

Did You Know

  • Norwegian entomologist Embrik Strand first described this spider in 1909.

Image Source: 

Phoneutria depilata is a spider belonging to the family of wandering spiders. It is endemic to Central America.

Phoneutria depilata

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: 10 cm

Color: They are brown, with stripes on their back and belly.

Other Characteristic Features: When threatened, these spiders will raise the first two pairs of limbs as a warning.

Eggs

The eggs are laid inside a sac made of webbing.

Spiderlings

After 28-34 days, the spiderlings emerge from the eggs.

The Web

Since these spiders are wandering hunters, they do not build elaborate webbing for catching prey.

Is the Phoneutria depilata Venomous

Like other spiders in its genus, they possess very potent venom. A bite from these spiders causes immense pain but is generally not fatal.

Quick Facts

Lifespan 1-2 years
Distribution Central America
Habitat Tropical forests
Diet Amphibians, mice, and reptiles

Did You Know

  • Norwegian entomologist Embrik Strand first described this spider in 1909.

Image Source: 

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