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Woodlouse (Dysdera crocata)

Named after the prey it feeds on (woodlice), this species has its origin in the Mediterranean area. Belonging to the Dysderidae family, the woodlouse spider does not make webs as it relies on hunting.

Scientific Classification

Woodlouse Spider

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Females are typically 0.43-0.60 in (1.0-1.5 cm) and males are 0.35-0.40 in (0.8-1.0 cm)

Woodlouse Spider Size

Color: The cephalothorax and legs are dark red while the glossy abdomen is yellowish brown.

Other Characteristic Features: The spider has six eyes along with an exceptionally large chelicerae or jaw.

Female Woodlouse Spider

Eggs

Average 70 eggs are laid in an egg cocoon that is made from a few silk strands.

Woodlouse Spider Egg

Spiderlings

After the hatching the young spiders remain dependent on their mothers until they attain maturity that comes after 1 to 1.5 years.

Woodlouse Spiderlings
Male Woodlouse Spider

Are Woodlouse Spiders Poisonous

The spider might bite with its strong and big jaw but it is not venomous to human. There could be an itching sensation that might last up to 1-2 hours.

Woodlouse Spider Fang
Pillbug Hunter

Quick Facts

Also Known as Pillbug hunter, slater spider, sowbug killer, sowbug hunter, woodlouse hunter
Distribution New Zealand, Australia, certain regions of South andNorth America, and South Africa
Habitat Bricks, rocks, underneath logs, and heap of leaves
Diet Primarily woodlice, earwigs, millipedes, and silverfish
Lifespan 3-4 years
IUCN Conservation Status Not listed
Sowbug Killer
Woodlouse Spider Picture

Did You Know

  • The spider is considered as one of the effective natural pesticides because it kills woodlice and doesn’t eat leaves at all.
  • The female woodlouse spider feed and care for her offspring which is quite rare in spider families.
  • Both the male and female engage in an aggressive mating ritual.
Woodlouse Hunter

Image Credit: I.guim.co.uk, 1.bp.blogspot.com, Thefridayspider.files.wordpress.com, Spiderid.com, Spiderhugger.com, Bugguide.net, C1.staticflickr.com, Arachne.org.au

Named after the prey it feeds on (woodlice), this species has its origin in the Mediterranean area. Belonging to the Dysderidae family, the woodlouse spider does not make webs as it relies on hunting.

Woodlouse Spider

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Females are typically 0.43-0.60 in (1.0-1.5 cm) and males are 0.35-0.40 in (0.8-1.0 cm)

Woodlouse Spider Size

Color: The cephalothorax and legs are dark red while the glossy abdomen is yellowish brown.

Other Characteristic Features: The spider has six eyes along with an exceptionally large chelicerae or jaw.

Female Woodlouse Spider

Eggs

Average 70 eggs are laid in an egg cocoon that is made from a few silk strands.

Woodlouse Spider Egg

Spiderlings

After the hatching the young spiders remain dependent on their mothers until they attain maturity that comes after 1 to 1.5 years.

Woodlouse Spiderlings
Male Woodlouse Spider

Are Woodlouse Spiders Poisonous

The spider might bite with its strong and big jaw but it is not venomous to human. There could be an itching sensation that might last up to 1-2 hours.

Woodlouse Spider Fang
Pillbug Hunter

Quick Facts

Also Known as Pillbug hunter, slater spider, sowbug killer, sowbug hunter, woodlouse hunter
Distribution New Zealand, Australia, certain regions of South andNorth America, and South Africa
Habitat Bricks, rocks, underneath logs, and heap of leaves
Diet Primarily woodlice, earwigs, millipedes, and silverfish
Lifespan 3-4 years
IUCN Conservation Status Not listed
Sowbug Killer
Woodlouse Spider Picture

Did You Know

  • The spider is considered as one of the effective natural pesticides because it kills woodlice and doesn’t eat leaves at all.
  • The female woodlouse spider feed and care for her offspring which is quite rare in spider families.
  • Both the male and female engage in an aggressive mating ritual.
Woodlouse Hunter

Image Credit: I.guim.co.uk, 1.bp.blogspot.com, Thefridayspider.files.wordpress.com, Spiderid.com, Spiderhugger.com, Bugguide.net, C1.staticflickr.com, Arachne.org.au

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