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Argiope lobata

The Argiope lobata is a member of the family of orb weaver spiders. These spiders are broadly distributed and found on three continents.

Argiope lobata

Scientific Classification

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Male: 0.6 cm (0.24 in) Female: 2.5 cm (0.98 in)

Color: Their abdomen is silver and covered with red and black spots.

Other Characteristic Features: There are distinct edges on the abdomen.

Eggs

After mating, female spiders lay their egg sac on the web constructed by a male. Each egg sac contains around 1400 eggs.

Spiderlings

Though the eggs hatch in autumn, they emerge after winter, staying inside the sac to stay warm.

The Web

They build zig-zag patterned webs with thicker white lines, called stabilimentum, into their webs. These help to camouflage them from prey and make the web visible to larger animals to prevent their destruction.

Is the Argiope lobata Spider Venomous

They are not particularly dangerous, with them only biting when threatened.

Quick Facts

Lifespan 1 year
Distribution Asia, southern Europe, and most of Africa
Habitat Open sand steppe grasslands and sand steppe meadows
Diet Flying insects

Did You Know

  • Prussian zoologist Peter Simon Pallas first described this spider in 1772.

Image Source: observation.org

The Argiope lobata is a member of the family of orb weaver spiders. These spiders are broadly distributed and found on three continents.

Argiope lobata

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Male: 0.6 cm (0.24 in) Female: 2.5 cm (0.98 in)

Color: Their abdomen is silver and covered with red and black spots.

Other Characteristic Features: There are distinct edges on the abdomen.

Eggs

After mating, female spiders lay their egg sac on the web constructed by a male. Each egg sac contains around 1400 eggs.

Spiderlings

Though the eggs hatch in autumn, they emerge after winter, staying inside the sac to stay warm.

The Web

They build zig-zag patterned webs with thicker white lines, called stabilimentum, into their webs. These help to camouflage them from prey and make the web visible to larger animals to prevent their destruction.

Is the Argiope lobata Spider Venomous

They are not particularly dangerous, with them only biting when threatened.

Quick Facts

Lifespan 1 year
Distribution Asia, southern Europe, and most of Africa
Habitat Open sand steppe grasslands and sand steppe meadows
Diet Flying insects

Did You Know

  • Prussian zoologist Peter Simon Pallas first described this spider in 1772.

Image Source: observation.org

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