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Furrow (Larinioides cornutus)

The furrow spider is an orb weaver species and both males and females hide during the entire day in their retreat and come out only at the evening. They are usually monogamous and females concentrate on producing more eggs if they get sufficient food.

Furrow Spider

Scientific Classification

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Females are 0.23-0.55 in (0.6-1.4 cm) and males are 0.19-0.35 in (0.48-0.88 cm)

Color: The coloration varies from one spider to another, still, pale rust color with brown and white shades are common combinations.

Other Characteristic Features: Both have beautiful abdomen with two sets of eyes featuring four eyes in each set.

Furrow Spider Size

Eggs

Females lay around 3-5 yellow eggs in an egg sac hidden under leaves or a cocoon.

Spiderlings

By the time spiderlings emerge, both of their parents die, so they live on their own from the beginning. They attain sexual maturity at 4-18 months.

The Web

They build orb webs close to the ground, mostly on damp vegetation or shrublands. Each night, they consume the web and then make a new one in the next evening.

Furrow Spider Web

Are Furrow Spiders Venomous

They are venomous for insects and their preys, but for humans, they are not a threat. Although they may bite, but that is not serious and doesn’t generally need any medicine.

Furrow Orb Weaver Spider

Quick Facts

Other Names Furrow orb spider, foliate spider
Distribution United States, Canada, eastern and southern Alaska, Japan, Eastern China, Egypt, Kamchatka Peninsula, and northeastern Algeria
Habitat Dense vegetation, near waterbodies, bridges, barns and houses
Diet Gnats, mosquitoes, and damselflies
Predators Black and yellow mud daubers, and birds
Web Type Orb web
IUCN Conservation Status Not listed
Male Furrow Spider

Did You Know

  • Male furrow spiders avoid female spiders until the mating seasons (autumn and spring) arrive.
Picture of a Furrow Spider

Image Credits: Nature.mdc.mo.gov, Fbcdn.net, Usaspiders.com, Bugguide.net, Cirrusimage.com

The furrow spider is an orb weaver species and both males and females hide during the entire day in their retreat and come out only at the evening. They are usually monogamous and females concentrate on producing more eggs if they get sufficient food.

Furrow Spider

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Females are 0.23-0.55 in (0.6-1.4 cm) and males are 0.19-0.35 in (0.48-0.88 cm)

Color: The coloration varies from one spider to another, still, pale rust color with brown and white shades are common combinations.

Other Characteristic Features: Both have beautiful abdomen with two sets of eyes featuring four eyes in each set.

Furrow Spider Size

Eggs

Females lay around 3-5 yellow eggs in an egg sac hidden under leaves or a cocoon.

Spiderlings

By the time spiderlings emerge, both of their parents die, so they live on their own from the beginning. They attain sexual maturity at 4-18 months.

The Web

They build orb webs close to the ground, mostly on damp vegetation or shrublands. Each night, they consume the web and then make a new one in the next evening.

Furrow Spider Web

Are Furrow Spiders Venomous

They are venomous for insects and their preys, but for humans, they are not a threat. Although they may bite, but that is not serious and doesn’t generally need any medicine.

Furrow Orb Weaver Spider

Quick Facts

Other Names Furrow orb spider, foliate spider
Distribution United States, Canada, eastern and southern Alaska, Japan, Eastern China, Egypt, Kamchatka Peninsula, and northeastern Algeria
Habitat Dense vegetation, near waterbodies, bridges, barns and houses
Diet Gnats, mosquitoes, and damselflies
Predators Black and yellow mud daubers, and birds
Web Type Orb web
IUCN Conservation Status Not listed
Male Furrow Spider

Did You Know

  • Male furrow spiders avoid female spiders until the mating seasons (autumn and spring) arrive.
Picture of a Furrow Spider

Image Credits: Nature.mdc.mo.gov, Fbcdn.net, Usaspiders.com, Bugguide.net, Cirrusimage.com

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