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Wrap-Around Spider (Dolophones conifer): Facts, Identifications &Pictures Wrap-Around Spider (Dolophones conifer): Facts, Identifications &Pictures
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Wrap-Around (Dolophones conifer)

The Wrap-around spider is a unique creature from Australia. It’s part of the Araneidae family. What’s cool about this spider? It can flatten its body and curl around trees to hide from danger. That’s how it got its special name. 

Scientific Classification

Wrap Around Spider

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

  • Size: Females are 9mm (0.35 inches) in size, while males are comparatively smaller being about 5-6 mm (0.19 to 0.23 inches) long. 
  • Color: They have a brown body which is in perfect camouflage with the bark and limbs of the trees where they live.
  • Other characteristics: Their upper abdomen is flat, resembling an inverted disc containing smaller discs having slits in the middle. They even have a fierce, dreadful look, when viewed from a close angle.
Wrap Around Spider Size

Eggs

Though not much information is obtained regarding the eggs, like most spiders of the Araneidae family, there may be about a hundred of them in a single egg sac which is mostly yellow in color.

Spiderlings

The spiderlings would remain with their family for a considerable period of time before dispersing.

The Web

They have large, vertical webs, spun mostly during the nighttime in between trees.

Are Wrap-Around Spiders Venomous?

Yes, Wrap-around spiders are venomous. But their venom is not harmful to humans. It’s mainly used to catch and eat their prey.

Can Wrap-Around Spiders Bite?

Yes, they can bite. However, their bite is usually not dangerous to people. It might cause some mild irritation or swelling, but nothing serious.

Wrap Around Tree Spider

Ecological Importance and Behavior of Wrap-Around Spider

The Wrap-around spider plays an important role in maintaining ecological balance by controlling pest populations such as insects that could otherwise damage crops or spread disease if left unchecked. These spiders also provide food for other animals such as birds or lizards who feed on them, thus forming part of the food chain within ecosystems where they live.

Natural Predators: The natural predators of Wrap-around Spiders include birds, lizards, frogs, wasps, mantids, and even other larger spiders that feed on them as part of their diet. Plus, some species of ants have been known to hunt down these spiders due to competition over resources such as food or shelter within their shared environment.

Prey-Predator Dynamics: The relationship between Wrap-around Spiders and their predators can be described as one of interdependence whereby both species rely on each other for survival. Predators feed on these spiders while they act as a source of sustenance for those same predators in turn – thus forming part of an interconnected web within any given ecosystem where both species coexist together harmoniously despite being natural enemies at heart.

Relationship with Humans: Humans generally view Wrap-around Spiders with caution due to fear stemming from myths surrounding arachnids in general. However, there is no need for alarm since these creatures pose no real threat unless provoked or disturbed directly by humans themselves – making it important that we respect these creatures’ space when encountered out in nature.

Wrap Around Spider Image

Quick Facts

Distribution Western Australia
HabitatMostly on branches and trunks of trees
DietInsects
Lifespan Not Known
The Wrap Around Spider

Did You Know

  • They were described for the first time in 1886.
  • Their body is filled with ring-like patterns because of which they are alternately called leopard spider.
  • Their perfect shape helps them to flatten their body comfortably and wrap around the tree branches, which is indeed a great way to remain concealed from predators.

In conclusion, the Wraparound spider is an important part of the Australian ecosystem, providing ecological balance and forming part of the food chain. With increased awareness and education, humans can come to appreciate these fascinating creatures more closely.

The Wrap-around spider is a unique creature from Australia. It’s part of the Araneidae family. What’s cool about this spider? It can flatten its body and curl around trees to hide from danger. That’s how it got its special name. 

Wrap Around Spider

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

  • Size: Females are 9mm (0.35 inches) in size, while males are comparatively smaller being about 5-6 mm (0.19 to 0.23 inches) long. 
  • Color: They have a brown body which is in perfect camouflage with the bark and limbs of the trees where they live.
  • Other characteristics: Their upper abdomen is flat, resembling an inverted disc containing smaller discs having slits in the middle. They even have a fierce, dreadful look, when viewed from a close angle.
Wrap Around Spider Size

Eggs

Though not much information is obtained regarding the eggs, like most spiders of the Araneidae family, there may be about a hundred of them in a single egg sac which is mostly yellow in color.

Spiderlings

The spiderlings would remain with their family for a considerable period of time before dispersing.

The Web

They have large, vertical webs, spun mostly during the nighttime in between trees.

Are Wrap-Around Spiders Venomous?

Yes, Wrap-around spiders are venomous. But their venom is not harmful to humans. It’s mainly used to catch and eat their prey.

Can Wrap-Around Spiders Bite?

Yes, they can bite. However, their bite is usually not dangerous to people. It might cause some mild irritation or swelling, but nothing serious.

Wrap Around Tree Spider

Ecological Importance and Behavior of Wrap-Around Spider

The Wrap-around spider plays an important role in maintaining ecological balance by controlling pest populations such as insects that could otherwise damage crops or spread disease if left unchecked. These spiders also provide food for other animals such as birds or lizards who feed on them, thus forming part of the food chain within ecosystems where they live.

Natural Predators: The natural predators of Wrap-around Spiders include birds, lizards, frogs, wasps, mantids, and even other larger spiders that feed on them as part of their diet. Plus, some species of ants have been known to hunt down these spiders due to competition over resources such as food or shelter within their shared environment.

Prey-Predator Dynamics: The relationship between Wrap-around Spiders and their predators can be described as one of interdependence whereby both species rely on each other for survival. Predators feed on these spiders while they act as a source of sustenance for those same predators in turn – thus forming part of an interconnected web within any given ecosystem where both species coexist together harmoniously despite being natural enemies at heart.

Relationship with Humans: Humans generally view Wrap-around Spiders with caution due to fear stemming from myths surrounding arachnids in general. However, there is no need for alarm since these creatures pose no real threat unless provoked or disturbed directly by humans themselves – making it important that we respect these creatures’ space when encountered out in nature.

Wrap Around Spider Image

Quick Facts

Distribution Western Australia
HabitatMostly on branches and trunks of trees
DietInsects
Lifespan Not Known
The Wrap Around Spider

Did You Know

  • They were described for the first time in 1886.
  • Their body is filled with ring-like patterns because of which they are alternately called leopard spider.
  • Their perfect shape helps them to flatten their body comfortably and wrap around the tree branches, which is indeed a great way to remain concealed from predators.

In conclusion, the Wraparound spider is an important part of the Australian ecosystem, providing ecological balance and forming part of the food chain. With increased awareness and education, humans can come to appreciate these fascinating creatures more closely.