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Texas Brown Tarantula (Aphonopelma hentzi)

Texas brown tarantula, alternately called Oklahoma brown tarantula or Missouri tarantula is commonly found in the southern parts of the United States.

Texas Brown Tarantula

Scientific Classification

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Females are 5.5 – 5.9 inches ( 14-15 cm) and males are 4.7- 5.5 inches (12-14 cm).

Color: They have a dark brown body, with the color varying from one tarantula species to the other. These spiders even have rusty orange hairs on their carapace.

Other Characteristic Features: Overall, they have a stocky and hairy appearance.

Texas Brown Tarantula Size

Eggs

Female spiders make egg sacs 4-5 months after copulation, and around 1,000 eggs are discharged there. The eggs remain securely encased within a web resembling a hammock, made inside their burrows. It takes 45-60 days for the eggs to hatch.

Spiderlings

Post hatching, the spiderlings often stay with their mothers for a few days and then go on to make their own burrows.

Texas Brown Tarantula Baby

The Web

Since they live in burrows, they secure the entrance with some web-like patterns in the shape of a hammock.

Texas Brown Tarantula Web

Is the Texas Brown Tarantula Venomous

The tarantula is not venomous, but its bite might cause irritations and allergies in some people. Their large fangs could result in a puncture wound in the case of a severe bite, which in turn may lead to an infection if untreated.

Texas Brown Tarantula Male Female

Quick Facts

Other Names Missouri tarantula, Oklahoma brown tarantula
Distribution Louisiana, Arkansas, New Mexico, Kansas, Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri, and Colorado
Habitat Burrows, grasslands, abandoned underground dens of other animals
Diet Grasshoppers, cockroaches, and crickets
Lifespan Females: 36-40 years
Males: 12-15 years
IUCN Conservation Status Not Listed
Texas Brown Tarantula Spider

Did You Know

  • Male Texas brown tarantula goes through molting phases and come out with a completely different appearance than their juvenile stage.

Image Credits: Bugguide.net, Citybugs.tamu.edu, Bdj.pensoft.net, 2.bp.blogspot.com, Nature-braun.blogspot.com, Pm1.narvii.com

Texas brown tarantula, alternately called Oklahoma brown tarantula or Missouri tarantula is commonly found in the southern parts of the United States.

Texas Brown Tarantula

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Females are 5.5 – 5.9 inches ( 14-15 cm) and males are 4.7- 5.5 inches (12-14 cm).

Color: They have a dark brown body, with the color varying from one tarantula species to the other. These spiders even have rusty orange hairs on their carapace.

Other Characteristic Features: Overall, they have a stocky and hairy appearance.

Texas Brown Tarantula Size

Eggs

Female spiders make egg sacs 4-5 months after copulation, and around 1,000 eggs are discharged there. The eggs remain securely encased within a web resembling a hammock, made inside their burrows. It takes 45-60 days for the eggs to hatch.

Spiderlings

Post hatching, the spiderlings often stay with their mothers for a few days and then go on to make their own burrows.

Texas Brown Tarantula Baby

The Web

Since they live in burrows, they secure the entrance with some web-like patterns in the shape of a hammock.

Texas Brown Tarantula Web

Is the Texas Brown Tarantula Venomous

The tarantula is not venomous, but its bite might cause irritations and allergies in some people. Their large fangs could result in a puncture wound in the case of a severe bite, which in turn may lead to an infection if untreated.

Texas Brown Tarantula Male Female

Quick Facts

Other Names Missouri tarantula, Oklahoma brown tarantula
Distribution Louisiana, Arkansas, New Mexico, Kansas, Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri, and Colorado
Habitat Burrows, grasslands, abandoned underground dens of other animals
Diet Grasshoppers, cockroaches, and crickets
Lifespan Females: 36-40 years
Males: 12-15 years
IUCN Conservation Status Not Listed
Texas Brown Tarantula Spider

Did You Know

  • Male Texas brown tarantula goes through molting phases and come out with a completely different appearance than their juvenile stage.

Image Credits: Bugguide.net, Citybugs.tamu.edu, Bdj.pensoft.net, 2.bp.blogspot.com, Nature-braun.blogspot.com, Pm1.narvii.com

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