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Texas Brown Tarantula (Aphonopelma hentzi)

The Texas brown tarantula is a common species hailing from the Aphonopelma genus. The color of the spider and its geographical range have both played an important role in the naming of the species.

Scientific Classification

Texas Brown Tarantula

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Females are 5.5-5.9 in ( 14-15 cm) and males are 4.7-5.5 in (12-14 cm).

Color: The cephalothorax and the abdomen both are brown, legs are darker brown and the hair on the body is rusty orange.

Other Characteristic Features: The legs often look grayish due to the texture of the hair on those parts.

Texas Brown Tarantula Size

Eggs

Female spiders make egg sacs 4-5 months after the copulation and around 1,000 eggs are discharged there. All of them are guarded by the mother spiders inside burrows. It takes 45-60 days for the eggs to be hatched.

Spiderlings

Post hatching, the spiderlings often stay with their mothers for a few days and then go on to make their own burrows.

Texas Brown Tarantula Baby

The Web

Since they live in burrows, they secure the entrance with some web-like patterns.

Texas Brown Tarantula Web

Are Texas Brown Tarantula Poisonous

The tarantula is not venomous, but its bite might cause irritations and allergy in some people.

Texas Brown Tarantula Male Female

Quick Facts

Other Names Missouri tarantula, Oklahoma brown tarantula
Distribution Louisiana, Arkansas, New Mexico, Kansas, Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri, and Colorado
Habitat Burrows, grasslands, abandoned underground dens of other animals
Diet Grasshoppers, cockroaches, and crickets
Lifespan Females: 36-40 years
Males: 12-15 years
IUCN Conservation Status Not Listed
Texas Brown Tarantula Spider

Did You Know

  • Their urticating hairs are the primary defense mechanism as they just eject them when feels threatened.
  • Male Texas brown tarantula goes through molting phases and come out with completely different looks than their juvenile states.

Image Credits: Bugguide.net, Citybugs.tamu.edu, Bdj.pensoft.net, 2.bp.blogspot.com, Nature-braun.blogspot.com, Pm1.narvii.com

The Texas brown tarantula is a common species hailing from the Aphonopelma genus. The color of the spider and its geographical range have both played an important role in the naming of the species.

Texas Brown Tarantula

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Females are 5.5-5.9 in ( 14-15 cm) and males are 4.7-5.5 in (12-14 cm).

Color: The cephalothorax and the abdomen both are brown, legs are darker brown and the hair on the body is rusty orange.

Other Characteristic Features: The legs often look grayish due to the texture of the hair on those parts.

Texas Brown Tarantula Size

Eggs

Female spiders make egg sacs 4-5 months after the copulation and around 1,000 eggs are discharged there. All of them are guarded by the mother spiders inside burrows. It takes 45-60 days for the eggs to be hatched.

Spiderlings

Post hatching, the spiderlings often stay with their mothers for a few days and then go on to make their own burrows.

Texas Brown Tarantula Baby

The Web

Since they live in burrows, they secure the entrance with some web-like patterns.

Texas Brown Tarantula Web

Are Texas Brown Tarantula Poisonous

The tarantula is not venomous, but its bite might cause irritations and allergy in some people.

Texas Brown Tarantula Male Female

Quick Facts

Other Names Missouri tarantula, Oklahoma brown tarantula
Distribution Louisiana, Arkansas, New Mexico, Kansas, Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri, and Colorado
Habitat Burrows, grasslands, abandoned underground dens of other animals
Diet Grasshoppers, cockroaches, and crickets
Lifespan Females: 36-40 years
Males: 12-15 years
IUCN Conservation Status Not Listed
Texas Brown Tarantula Spider

Did You Know

  • Their urticating hairs are the primary defense mechanism as they just eject them when feels threatened.
  • Male Texas brown tarantula goes through molting phases and come out with completely different looks than their juvenile states.

Image Credits: Bugguide.net, Citybugs.tamu.edu, Bdj.pensoft.net, 2.bp.blogspot.com, Nature-braun.blogspot.com, Pm1.narvii.com

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