Home / Orb Weavers / Yellow Garden (Argiope aurantia)

Yellow Garden (Argiope aurantia)

Yellow garden spiders are a non-aggressive species, belonging to the group of orb-weavers. The combination of yellow and black makes them conspicuous and they are known for their incredibly intricate web patterns.

Scientific Classification

Yellow Garden

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Males are 0.19-0.35 in (5-9 mm) while females are 0.74-1.1 in (19-30 mm)

Coloration: The egg-shaped black abdomen has orange and yellow stripes throughout, except for the middle, where there is one black stripe and a few yellow spots. The cephalothorax, or front part of the body, has short silvery hair and the eight legs are black with occasional red, yellow, and orange markings at the base (near the abdomen).

Yellow Garden Spider

Yellow Garden Spider Pictures

Other Characteristic Features: The legs have three claws each.

Eggs

Thousands of eggs are released into multiple sacs, each sizing approx 0.9 inch.

Yellow Garden Spider Eggs

Spiderlings

The tiny black spiderlings remain inside the sac until spring, even though the eggs hatch by the end of summer or autumn. Later they leave the sack, moving around with the help of the wind and a tiny thread of silk.

Yellow Garden Spiderlings

How Poisonous is the Yellow Garden Spider

It might sting humans, but only when it is scared. The venom does not do any harm, but the bite may be a little painful, like a bee sting. There are research and studies carried out in regards to the utility of the venom in medical science.

Black and Yellow Garden Spider

Yellow Black Garden Spider

Quick Facts

Also Known as Black and yellow garden spider, golden garden spider, McKinley spider, zigzag spider, corn spider, writing spider,and yellow garden orb weavers
Distribution Central America, Southern Canada, Conterminous United States, and Mexico
Habitat Tall plants, flowers and shrubs with extremely good exposure of the sun and less wind
Web Type Orb web
Poison Fact Non-toxic to human
Diet Grasshoppers, aphids, bees, wasps, and flies
Mode of Communication Due to their poor eyesight, they communicate through vibration of the web and perceive things by the air current
Mode of Reproduction Oviparous
Number of Eggs 1,000-4,000 eggs  released inside 3-4 brown silk egg sacs
Lifespan Approximately 1 year
Predators Lizards, birds, some types of wasps, and shrews
IUCN Conservation Status Not listed

Yellow Garden Spider Female

Yellow Garden Spider Images

Golden Garden Spider

Did You Know

  • A female yellow garden spider can prey on insects 200% of her size.
  • The scientific name of the species Argiope aurantia means ‘gilded silver-face’ in Latin. Also the word ‘aurantia’ comes from ‘aurantium’ that stands for the fruit orange.
  • Its colloquial name, ‘writing spider’, has come from the specific zigzag pattern in its web that resembles writing, or a signature.
  • The overwintering of the egg case provides safety for the young spiders from the predators.
  • The cocoon or sacs of the yellow garden spiders are often used by different species of spiders and insects.

Yellow Garden Spider Web

Yellow Garden Spider Size

Image Credits: Steemitimages.com, Haydensanimalfacts.files.wordpress.com, Nature.mdc.mo.gov, C1.staticflickr.com, Cms.capitoltechsolutions.com, I1.treknature.com, Ianadamsphotography.com, Infinitespider.com, Spiderid.com, Termitepestsolutions.com

Yellow garden spiders are a non-aggressive species, belonging to the group of orb-weavers. The combination of yellow and black makes them conspicuous and they are known for their incredibly intricate web patterns.

Yellow Garden

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Males are 0.19-0.35 in (5-9 mm) while females are 0.74-1.1 in (19-30 mm)

Coloration: The egg-shaped black abdomen has orange and yellow stripes throughout, except for the middle, where there is one black stripe and a few yellow spots. The cephalothorax, or front part of the body, has short silvery hair and the eight legs are black with occasional red, yellow, and orange markings at the base (near the abdomen).

Yellow Garden Spider

Yellow Garden Spider Pictures

Other Characteristic Features: The legs have three claws each.

Eggs

Thousands of eggs are released into multiple sacs, each sizing approx 0.9 inch.

Yellow Garden Spider Eggs

Spiderlings

The tiny black spiderlings remain inside the sac until spring, even though the eggs hatch by the end of summer or autumn. Later they leave the sack, moving around with the help of the wind and a tiny thread of silk.

Yellow Garden Spiderlings

How Poisonous is the Yellow Garden Spider

It might sting humans, but only when it is scared. The venom does not do any harm, but the bite may be a little painful, like a bee sting. There are research and studies carried out in regards to the utility of the venom in medical science.

Black and Yellow Garden Spider

Yellow Black Garden Spider

Quick Facts

Also Known as Black and yellow garden spider, golden garden spider, McKinley spider, zigzag spider, corn spider, writing spider,and yellow garden orb weavers
Distribution Central America, Southern Canada, Conterminous United States, and Mexico
Habitat Tall plants, flowers and shrubs with extremely good exposure of the sun and less wind
Web Type Orb web
Poison Fact Non-toxic to human
Diet Grasshoppers, aphids, bees, wasps, and flies
Mode of Communication Due to their poor eyesight, they communicate through vibration of the web and perceive things by the air current
Mode of Reproduction Oviparous
Number of Eggs 1,000-4,000 eggs  released inside 3-4 brown silk egg sacs
Lifespan Approximately 1 year
Predators Lizards, birds, some types of wasps, and shrews
IUCN Conservation Status Not listed

Yellow Garden Spider Female

Yellow Garden Spider Images

Golden Garden Spider

Did You Know

  • A female yellow garden spider can prey on insects 200% of her size.
  • The scientific name of the species Argiope aurantia means ‘gilded silver-face’ in Latin. Also the word ‘aurantia’ comes from ‘aurantium’ that stands for the fruit orange.
  • Its colloquial name, ‘writing spider’, has come from the specific zigzag pattern in its web that resembles writing, or a signature.
  • The overwintering of the egg case provides safety for the young spiders from the predators.
  • The cocoon or sacs of the yellow garden spiders are often used by different species of spiders and insects.

Yellow Garden Spider Web

Yellow Garden Spider Size

Image Credits: Steemitimages.com, Haydensanimalfacts.files.wordpress.com, Nature.mdc.mo.gov, C1.staticflickr.com, Cms.capitoltechsolutions.com, I1.treknature.com, Ianadamsphotography.com, Infinitespider.com, Spiderid.com, Termitepestsolutions.com

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