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Barn Funnel Weaver (Tegenaria domestica)

The Barn Funnel Weaving Spider is a species of common spiders found in many places across the world and are known in different names including Domestic House Spider in Europe, Common House Spider in the Pacific Northwest, as well as Drain Spider and Lesser European House Spider. They are a close relative to the much common hobo spider.

Barn Funnel Weaver

Scientific Classification

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Females are larger with a length of 7.5–11.5 mm (0.30–0.45 in), while the males are between 6–9 mm (0.24–0.35 in).

Color: Body color varies from dark orange to brown, beige, or grayish with striped legs and two faint, black, longitudinal stripes across the cephalothorax. The abdomen region is marked in beige, gray, or brown.

Other Characteristic Features: They have an elongated body with a straight abdomen and a flat cephalothorax. They are known for their high speed, and can move in lightning speed from one corner of the web to another if they are attacked or can sense that its prey has got stuck in the web.

Barn Funnel Weaver Spider Size

Eggs

In late autumn, the female lays its eggs. Each egg sac contains up to 50 eggs and is placed at the tip of the funnel suspended from silk lines, or in other locations close to the web where the mother protects the eggs until they are ready to hatch. In its entire lifespan, the female can produce up to nine egg sacs.

Barn Funnel Weaver Egg Sac

Spiderlings

The baby funnel weaver spiders undergo a process of simple metamorphosis. The spiderlings hatch out of the eggs and resemble a tiny version of the adults.  As they grow, they keep shedding their skin.

How Poisonous is the Barn Funnel Weaver Spider

This species is not venomous for humans, and they rarely bite. Even if they do, the bite is painless. There have been no documented cases of barn funnel weaver bites. However, it seems quite reasonable to assume that their bite will not develop symptoms greater than the grass spider, their cousin, that only give mild symptoms like local swelling, redness, or some itching.

Barn Funnel Weaver Web

Quick Facts

Lifespan Females that live indoors can live anything between 2-7 years, while those living outdoor usually die of cold. The males hardly live for a year.
Distribution Ranges throughout the world, starting Scandinavia to far north, to far south till Greece in Europe
Habitat Can be found in different structures mostly in sheds and barns, door crevices, as also in the cracks of or under rocks
Common predators Reptiles like lizards, chameleons, snakes, etc., as well as various species of birds
Diet Various kinds of insects
Barn Funnel Weaver Female

Did You Know

  • If the cobweb of this spider is attacked or destroyed, the creature hurriedly escapes and often coil its body into a ball against some nearby object.
  • They are known to be photosensitive, i.e., move or flee away from the light.
  • They are also called ‘drain spider’ since they often stuck in sinks and cannot crawl out.
Barn Funnel Weaver Spider
Barn Funnel Weaver Spider Picture

Image Credits: Bugguide.net, Spidersinohio.net, Farm1.staticflickr.com, Nathistoc.bio.uci.edu, Pidersinohio.net, Bugwoodcloud.org

The Barn Funnel Weaving Spider is a species of common spiders found in many places across the world and are known in different names including Domestic House Spider in Europe, Common House Spider in the Pacific Northwest, as well as Drain Spider and Lesser European House Spider. They are a close relative to the much common hobo spider.

Barn Funnel Weaver

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Females are larger with a length of 7.5–11.5 mm (0.30–0.45 in), while the males are between 6–9 mm (0.24–0.35 in).

Color: Body color varies from dark orange to brown, beige, or grayish with striped legs and two faint, black, longitudinal stripes across the cephalothorax. The abdomen region is marked in beige, gray, or brown.

Other Characteristic Features: They have an elongated body with a straight abdomen and a flat cephalothorax. They are known for their high speed, and can move in lightning speed from one corner of the web to another if they are attacked or can sense that its prey has got stuck in the web.

Barn Funnel Weaver Spider Size

Eggs

In late autumn, the female lays its eggs. Each egg sac contains up to 50 eggs and is placed at the tip of the funnel suspended from silk lines, or in other locations close to the web where the mother protects the eggs until they are ready to hatch. In its entire lifespan, the female can produce up to nine egg sacs.

Barn Funnel Weaver Egg Sac

Spiderlings

The baby funnel weaver spiders undergo a process of simple metamorphosis. The spiderlings hatch out of the eggs and resemble a tiny version of the adults.  As they grow, they keep shedding their skin.

How Poisonous is the Barn Funnel Weaver Spider

This species is not venomous for humans, and they rarely bite. Even if they do, the bite is painless. There have been no documented cases of barn funnel weaver bites. However, it seems quite reasonable to assume that their bite will not develop symptoms greater than the grass spider, their cousin, that only give mild symptoms like local swelling, redness, or some itching.

Barn Funnel Weaver Web

Quick Facts

Lifespan Females that live indoors can live anything between 2-7 years, while those living outdoor usually die of cold. The males hardly live for a year.
Distribution Ranges throughout the world, starting Scandinavia to far north, to far south till Greece in Europe
Habitat Can be found in different structures mostly in sheds and barns, door crevices, as also in the cracks of or under rocks
Common predators Reptiles like lizards, chameleons, snakes, etc., as well as various species of birds
Diet Various kinds of insects
Barn Funnel Weaver Female

Did You Know

  • If the cobweb of this spider is attacked or destroyed, the creature hurriedly escapes and often coil its body into a ball against some nearby object.
  • They are known to be photosensitive, i.e., move or flee away from the light.
  • They are also called ‘drain spider’ since they often stuck in sinks and cannot crawl out.
Barn Funnel Weaver Spider
Barn Funnel Weaver Spider Picture

Image Credits: Bugguide.net, Spidersinohio.net, Farm1.staticflickr.com, Nathistoc.bio.uci.edu, Pidersinohio.net, Bugwoodcloud.org

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