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Dimorphic Jumping Spider (Maevia inclemens): Facts, Identification & Pictures Dimorphic Jumping Spider (Maevia inclemens): Facts, Identification & Pictures
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Dimorphic Jumping (Maevia inclemens)

The Dimorphic Jumping Spider is a bright creature from North America. “Dimorphic” means having two forms. What’s special about these spiders? Male spiders of this type can look different from each other, which is unusual in the animal world.

Scientific Classification

Dimorphic Jumping Spider

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

  • Size:  The females are 0.26 – 0.31 inches (6.5 – 8.0 mm) long, while males are a little smaller and possess a body length of 0.18 – 0.25 inches (4.75 – 6.50 mm).

Dimorphic Jumping Spider Size

  • Color: The overall colors can be black or beige, as well as red, white, tan, or yellow. The two forms of males, as discussed above, would show a variety of coloration. The “tufted” morph’s body and pedipalps are black. They even have three black tufts on their head, alongside pale legs. The grey morph is striped in black and white throughout with orange palps, but devoid of tufts. On the other hand, the females have a light brown carapace, chalky or rust-shaded abdomen, with a chevron pattern at the center, pale legs without marking, and black bands on each side of their body with thinly covered orange scales. 
  • Other Characteristic Features: Of the eight eyes, the main ones are large, and situated in the frontal-center position. The rest of the three pairs lie on their heard sides, mainly used for detecting motion. Like most other jumping spider species, their forelegs are large while the back legs remain powerful but short.  

Eggs

The small, round eggs remain enclosed in a thick and fluffy sac.

Spiderlings

They are small and disperse to live independently upon maturation.

The Web

Like all other jumping spiders, this one too does not spin a web but produces silk to catch prey, lay eggs, and molt.

Are Dimorphic Jumping Spiders Venomous?

Yes, Dimorphic Jumping Spiders have venom, but it’s mostly used to subdue their tiny prey.

Can Dimorphic Jumping Spiders Bite?

They might bite when scared or provoked, but the venom present in their fangs would not pose any medical threat to humans. Most of the jumping spider species have a docile nature, running away from people instead of attacking them.

Dimorphic Jumping Spider Male

Photo Credit: Luke Ciancio

Ecological Importance and Behavior of Dimorphic Jumping Spider

Dimorphic Jumping Spiders play a pivotal role in maintaining the ecological balance within their environments. As agile predators, they control the population of insects, which if left unchecked, could disrupt the ecosystem. Their hunting method is fascinating – these spiders do not rely on webs to catch their prey; instead, they exhibit a remarkable jumping ability, pouncing upon their target with precision and agility.

Behaviorally, these spiders are known for their exceptional eyesight, which they utilize not only for hunting but also for navigating their surroundings and communicating with potential mates. The intricate courtship dance of the males is a spectacle, driven by visual cues and subtle movements that appeal to the discerning eyes of the females.

Natural Predator: Despite being predators themselves, Dimorphic Jumping Spiders are not atop the food chain. They fall prey to various birds, larger spiders, and even some species of wasps which specialize in hunting spiders. These natural predators help regulate the spider population, ensuring that it doesn’t swell to a size that could be detrimental to other species within the same ecosystem.

Prey-Predator Dynamics: The interaction between Dimorphic Jumping Spiders and their prey is a classic example of the predator-prey dynamics that drive evolutionary processes. The spider’s hunting prowess puts selective pressure on their prey, which in turn evolves better escape strategies. This dynamic is a fundamental process that drives the evolutionary adaptations in both the predator and the prey species.

Relationship with Humans: Dimorphic Jumping Spiders, despite their venomous capability, maintain a relatively benign relationship with humans. Their presence is often unnoticed due to their small size and the fact that they do not spin webs, which are typically the reason spiders are spotted within human dwellings. When encounters do occur, these spiders are more likely to flee than engage. Their bite, while rare, is not considered medically significant to humans.

Quick Facts

Other NamesDimorphic jumper
DistributionEastern and mid-western parts of the United States including Alabama, Virginia, Wisconsin, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Indiana, Pennsylvania, Virginia, New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, and New Jersey; parts of Canada including Manitoba, and Quebec
HabitatForests, near vine and ivy vegetation, as well as human-made structures
PredatorsSpecies of the wandering and wolf spider family
DietSmaller insects, mites, scorpions, and also other spiders
LifespanApproximately one year

Dimorphic Jumping Spider Female

Did You Know

  • They are known for their excellent vision that is keener than a cat’s and about ten times as acute as that of a dragonfly.
  • Inclemens in Latin stands for harsh, rough, or cruel.
  • Studies show that females do not incline towards a particular male morph during courtship. Instead, they get attracted to males based on their movement.  Yet, the grey morphs are said to attract the female’s attention faster than the tufted ones.

In summary, the Dimorphic Jumping Spider is a species that not only intrigues with its dimorphic males but also plays a crucial role in its ecosystem as a predator.

The Dimorphic Jumping Spider is a bright creature from North America. “Dimorphic” means having two forms. What’s special about these spiders? Male spiders of this type can look different from each other, which is unusual in the animal world.

Dimorphic Jumping Spider

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

  • Size:  The females are 0.26 – 0.31 inches (6.5 – 8.0 mm) long, while males are a little smaller and possess a body length of 0.18 – 0.25 inches (4.75 – 6.50 mm).

Dimorphic Jumping Spider Size

  • Color: The overall colors can be black or beige, as well as red, white, tan, or yellow. The two forms of males, as discussed above, would show a variety of coloration. The “tufted” morph’s body and pedipalps are black. They even have three black tufts on their head, alongside pale legs. The grey morph is striped in black and white throughout with orange palps, but devoid of tufts. On the other hand, the females have a light brown carapace, chalky or rust-shaded abdomen, with a chevron pattern at the center, pale legs without marking, and black bands on each side of their body with thinly covered orange scales. 
  • Other Characteristic Features: Of the eight eyes, the main ones are large, and situated in the frontal-center position. The rest of the three pairs lie on their heard sides, mainly used for detecting motion. Like most other jumping spider species, their forelegs are large while the back legs remain powerful but short.  

Eggs

The small, round eggs remain enclosed in a thick and fluffy sac.

Spiderlings

They are small and disperse to live independently upon maturation.

The Web

Like all other jumping spiders, this one too does not spin a web but produces silk to catch prey, lay eggs, and molt.

Are Dimorphic Jumping Spiders Venomous?

Yes, Dimorphic Jumping Spiders have venom, but it’s mostly used to subdue their tiny prey.

Can Dimorphic Jumping Spiders Bite?

They might bite when scared or provoked, but the venom present in their fangs would not pose any medical threat to humans. Most of the jumping spider species have a docile nature, running away from people instead of attacking them.

Dimorphic Jumping Spider Male

Photo Credit: Luke Ciancio

Ecological Importance and Behavior of Dimorphic Jumping Spider

Dimorphic Jumping Spiders play a pivotal role in maintaining the ecological balance within their environments. As agile predators, they control the population of insects, which if left unchecked, could disrupt the ecosystem. Their hunting method is fascinating – these spiders do not rely on webs to catch their prey; instead, they exhibit a remarkable jumping ability, pouncing upon their target with precision and agility.

Behaviorally, these spiders are known for their exceptional eyesight, which they utilize not only for hunting but also for navigating their surroundings and communicating with potential mates. The intricate courtship dance of the males is a spectacle, driven by visual cues and subtle movements that appeal to the discerning eyes of the females.

Natural Predator: Despite being predators themselves, Dimorphic Jumping Spiders are not atop the food chain. They fall prey to various birds, larger spiders, and even some species of wasps which specialize in hunting spiders. These natural predators help regulate the spider population, ensuring that it doesn’t swell to a size that could be detrimental to other species within the same ecosystem.

Prey-Predator Dynamics: The interaction between Dimorphic Jumping Spiders and their prey is a classic example of the predator-prey dynamics that drive evolutionary processes. The spider’s hunting prowess puts selective pressure on their prey, which in turn evolves better escape strategies. This dynamic is a fundamental process that drives the evolutionary adaptations in both the predator and the prey species.

Relationship with Humans: Dimorphic Jumping Spiders, despite their venomous capability, maintain a relatively benign relationship with humans. Their presence is often unnoticed due to their small size and the fact that they do not spin webs, which are typically the reason spiders are spotted within human dwellings. When encounters do occur, these spiders are more likely to flee than engage. Their bite, while rare, is not considered medically significant to humans.

Quick Facts

Other NamesDimorphic jumper
DistributionEastern and mid-western parts of the United States including Alabama, Virginia, Wisconsin, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Indiana, Pennsylvania, Virginia, New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, and New Jersey; parts of Canada including Manitoba, and Quebec
HabitatForests, near vine and ivy vegetation, as well as human-made structures
PredatorsSpecies of the wandering and wolf spider family
DietSmaller insects, mites, scorpions, and also other spiders
LifespanApproximately one year

Dimorphic Jumping Spider Female

Did You Know

  • They are known for their excellent vision that is keener than a cat’s and about ten times as acute as that of a dragonfly.
  • Inclemens in Latin stands for harsh, rough, or cruel.
  • Studies show that females do not incline towards a particular male morph during courtship. Instead, they get attracted to males based on their movement.  Yet, the grey morphs are said to attract the female’s attention faster than the tufted ones.

In summary, the Dimorphic Jumping Spider is a species that not only intrigues with its dimorphic males but also plays a crucial role in its ecosystem as a predator.