Tigrosa

The Tigrosa genus belongs to the Lycosidae family indigenous to parts of North America. The World Spider Catalog comprises of five species as per the May 2016 reports.

Tigrosa Spider

Spiders Belonging To This Genus

Tigrosa annexa Tigrosa aspersa Tigrosa Georgicola
Tigrosa grandis Tigrosa helluo

Physical Description & Identification

Adults

Size: Females are 20 mm (0.8 inches) long, while the males appear smaller.

Color: They are brown, gray, or black.

Other Characteristic Features: The upper dorsal part of their cephalothorax has a distinctive pattern. They may even have big, prominent eyes like most members of the wolf spider family.

Eggs

Like other members of the wolf spider family, egg sacs of these spiders remain attached to their spinnerets.

Spiderlings

The juveniles depart from their mother upon maturation.

The Web

As a member of the wolf spider family, most species of this genus do not make a web but roam around at night in search of their food.

Are Species of the Tigrosa Genus Poisonous and Do They Bite

Though species of this genus display aggression, they are harmless to humans, with their bites causing localized pain and swelling.

Quick Facts

Lifespan One year
Distribution Parts of the United States, Canada, Mexico
Habitat Shrublands, gardens, woodlands and dark corners of thehome
Predators Bird, wasps, geckoes
Diet Small insects

Did You Know

  • Allen R. Brady described this genus in the year 2012.
  • Before 1990, many spiders of the wolf spider family were a part of Tigrosa, but some of them were moved to the Hogna genus.

Image Credits: alchetron.com

The Tigrosa genus belongs to the Lycosidae family indigenous to parts of North America. The World Spider Catalog comprises of five species as per the May 2016 reports.

Tigrosa Spider

Spiders Belonging To This Genus

Tigrosa annexa Tigrosa aspersa Tigrosa Georgicola
Tigrosa grandis Tigrosa helluo

Physical Description & Identification

Adults

Size: Females are 20 mm (0.8 inches) long, while the males appear smaller.

Color: They are brown, gray, or black.

Other Characteristic Features: The upper dorsal part of their cephalothorax has a distinctive pattern. They may even have big, prominent eyes like most members of the wolf spider family.

Eggs

Like other members of the wolf spider family, egg sacs of these spiders remain attached to their spinnerets.

Spiderlings

The juveniles depart from their mother upon maturation.

The Web

As a member of the wolf spider family, most species of this genus do not make a web but roam around at night in search of their food.

Are Species of the Tigrosa Genus Poisonous and Do They Bite

Though species of this genus display aggression, they are harmless to humans, with their bites causing localized pain and swelling.

Quick Facts

Lifespan One year
Distribution Parts of the United States, Canada, Mexico
Habitat Shrublands, gardens, woodlands and dark corners of thehome
Predators Bird, wasps, geckoes
Diet Small insects

Did You Know

  • Allen R. Brady described this genus in the year 2012.
  • Before 1990, many spiders of the wolf spider family were a part of Tigrosa, but some of them were moved to the Hogna genus.

Image Credits: alchetron.com

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