Euophrys

This genus is a group of jumping spiders, exhibiting some exclusive physical attributes. There are around 108 species belonging to this genus.

Spiders Belonging to this Genus

Euophrys Spider
E. acripes E. alabardata E. albimana
E. albopatella E. altera E. alticola
E. arenaria E. astuta E. auricolor
E. baliola E. banksi E. bifida
E. bifoveolata E. bryophila E. canariensis
E. capicola E. catherinae E. cochlea
E. concolorata E. convergentis E. cooki
E. crux E. declivis E. dhaulagirica
E. difficilis E. elizabethae E. evae
E. everestensis E. falciger E. ferrumequinum
E. flavoatra E. frontalis E. fucata
E. gambosa E. gracilis E. granulate
E. griswoldi E. heliophaniformis E. herbigrada
E. innotata E. jirica E. kataokai
E. kawkaban E. kirghizica E. kororensis
E. leipoldti E. leucopalpis E. leucostigma
E. limpopo E. littoralis E. longyangensis
E. lunata E. luteolineata E. manicata
E. marmarica E. maseruensis E. maura
E. megastyla E. melanoleuca E. menemerella
E. meridionalis E. miranda E. monadnock
E. namulinensis E. nana E. nanchonensis
E. nangqianensis E. nepalica E. newtoni
E. nigripalpis E. nigritarsis E. nigromaculata

Himalayan Jumping (Euophrys omnisuperstes)

E. patellaris E. pelzelni
E. peruviana E. petrensis E. pexa
E. proszynskii E. pseudogambosa E. pulchella
E. purcelli E. quadricolor E. quadripunctata
E. recta E. robusta E. rubroclypea
E. rufa E. rufibarbis E. rufimana
E. sanctimatei E. sedula E. semirufa
E. sima E. sinapicolor E. subtilis
E. sulphurea E. tengchongensis E. terrestris
E. testaceozonata E. turkmenica E. uphami
E. uralensis E. valens E. wanyan
E. wenxianensis E. ysobolii E. yulungensis

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Female jumping spiders have a wide range of 0.03-0.98 in (0.07-2.4 cm), and males have a smaller appearance.

Color: The variation is plenty, as there are different species with exclusive colorations. Some have neon shades like peacock blue, orange, and others have typical brown and tan shades.

Other Characteristic Features: These spiders have a hairy body, and their two anterior eyes are placed at the front, being substantial than the other two. They have a total of four pairs of eyes.

Eggs

The female spiders of the genus make sacs for laying eggs. They protect the eggs.

Spiderlings

Spiderlings are similar to adult spiders when it comes to physical appearance.

The Web

The spiders hunt their prey by jumping and chasing. They do not make webs.

Are Spiders of Euophrys Genus Venomous

Some species can bite people when they get threatened, but that does not cause any serious harm other than allergies or redness.

Quick Facts

Distribution Windward Islands and Himalaya, South, North, and Central America,  Asia, Europe, Oceania, and Africa
Habitat From mountains to woodlands, forested areas to human habitats
Diet Insects, other web and jumping spiders, pollen, nectar.
Lifespan 1-2 years

Did You Know

  • The genus was first described in 1834, by the German arachnologist, Ludwig Carl Christian Koch.
  • The Himalayan Jumping spider, belonging to this genus, happens to be one of the living creatures, living in the highest point of the world.

Image Credits: naturespot.org.uk

This genus is a group of jumping spiders, exhibiting some exclusive physical attributes. There are around 108 species belonging to this genus.

Spiders Belonging to this Genus

Euophrys Spider
E. acripes E. alabardata E. albimana
E. albopatella E. altera E. alticola
E. arenaria E. astuta E. auricolor
E. baliola E. banksi E. bifida
E. bifoveolata E. bryophila E. canariensis
E. capicola E. catherinae E. cochlea
E. concolorata E. convergentis E. cooki
E. crux E. declivis E. dhaulagirica
E. difficilis E. elizabethae E. evae
E. everestensis E. falciger E. ferrumequinum
E. flavoatra E. frontalis E. fucata
E. gambosa E. gracilis E. granulate
E. griswoldi E. heliophaniformis E. herbigrada
E. innotata E. jirica E. kataokai
E. kawkaban E. kirghizica E. kororensis
E. leipoldti E. leucopalpis E. leucostigma
E. limpopo E. littoralis E. longyangensis
E. lunata E. luteolineata E. manicata
E. marmarica E. maseruensis E. maura
E. megastyla E. melanoleuca E. menemerella
E. meridionalis E. miranda E. monadnock
E. namulinensis E. nana E. nanchonensis
E. nangqianensis E. nepalica E. newtoni
E. nigripalpis E. nigritarsis E. nigromaculata

Himalayan Jumping (Euophrys omnisuperstes)

E. patellaris E. pelzelni
E. peruviana E. petrensis E. pexa
E. proszynskii E. pseudogambosa E. pulchella
E. purcelli E. quadricolor E. quadripunctata
E. recta E. robusta E. rubroclypea
E. rufa E. rufibarbis E. rufimana
E. sanctimatei E. sedula E. semirufa
E. sima E. sinapicolor E. subtilis
E. sulphurea E. tengchongensis E. terrestris
E. testaceozonata E. turkmenica E. uphami
E. uralensis E. valens E. wanyan
E. wenxianensis E. ysobolii E. yulungensis

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: Female jumping spiders have a wide range of 0.03-0.98 in (0.07-2.4 cm), and males have a smaller appearance.

Color: The variation is plenty, as there are different species with exclusive colorations. Some have neon shades like peacock blue, orange, and others have typical brown and tan shades.

Other Characteristic Features: These spiders have a hairy body, and their two anterior eyes are placed at the front, being substantial than the other two. They have a total of four pairs of eyes.

Eggs

The female spiders of the genus make sacs for laying eggs. They protect the eggs.

Spiderlings

Spiderlings are similar to adult spiders when it comes to physical appearance.

The Web

The spiders hunt their prey by jumping and chasing. They do not make webs.

Are Spiders of Euophrys Genus Venomous

Some species can bite people when they get threatened, but that does not cause any serious harm other than allergies or redness.

Quick Facts

Distribution Windward Islands and Himalaya, South, North, and Central America,  Asia, Europe, Oceania, and Africa
Habitat From mountains to woodlands, forested areas to human habitats
Diet Insects, other web and jumping spiders, pollen, nectar.
Lifespan 1-2 years

Did You Know

  • The genus was first described in 1834, by the German arachnologist, Ludwig Carl Christian Koch.
  • The Himalayan Jumping spider, belonging to this genus, happens to be one of the living creatures, living in the highest point of the world.

Image Credits: naturespot.org.uk

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *