Euophrys

Euophrys genus of the jumping spider family containing 108 species is distributed throughout the continents of Oceania, America, Africa, Europe, and Asia.

Spiders Belonging to this Genus

Euophrys Spider
E. acripes E. alabardata E. albimana
E. albopatella E. altera E. alticola
E. arenaria E. astuta E. auricolor
E. baliola E. banksi E. bifida
E. bifoveolata E. bryophila E. canariensis
E. capicola E. catherinae E. cochlea
E. concolorata E. convergentis E. cooki
E. crux E. declivis E. dhaulagirica
E. difficilis E. elizabethae E. evae
E. everestensis E. falciger E. ferrumequinum
E. flavoatra E. frontalis E. fucata
E. gambosa E. gracilis E. granulate
E. griswoldi E. heliophaniformis E. herbigrada
E. innotata E. jirica E. kataokai
E. kawkaban E. kirghizica E. kororensis
E. leipoldti E. leucopalpis E. leucostigma
E. limpopo E. littoralis E. longyangensis
E. lunata E. luteolineata E. manicata
E. marmarica E. maseruensis E. maura
E. megastyla E. melanoleuca E. menemerella
E. meridionalis E. miranda E. monadnock
E. namulinensis E. nana E. nanchonensis
E. nangqianensis E. nepalica E. newtoni
E. nigripalpis E. nigritarsis E. nigromaculata

Himalayan Jumping (Euophrys omnisuperstes)

Scientific Classification

E. patellaris E. pelzelni
E. peruviana E. petrensis E. pexa
E. proszynskii E. pseudogambosa E. pulchella
E. purcelli E. quadricolor E. quadripunctata
E. recta E. robusta E. rubroclypea
E. rufa E. rufibarbis E. rufimana
E. sanctimatei E. sedula E. semirufa
E. sima E. sinapicolor E. subtilis
E. sulphurea E. tengchongensis E. terrestris
E. testaceozonata E. turkmenica E. uphami
E. uralensis E. valens E. wanyan
E. wenxianensis E. ysobolii E. yulungensis

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: They have a length of 0.03 – 0.98 inches (0.07-2.4 cm), with the males being smaller than the females.

Color: The variation is plenty, as there are different species with exclusive colorations. Some have neon shades like peacock blue, orange, while others come in colors of brown and tan.

Other Characteristic Features: Most spiders of this genus have a hairy appearance. The Himalayan jumping spider has fringes of pale brown hairs on their anterior eyes which are equally spaced.

Eggs

The eggs remain within the silken case, guarded by the females till the time they hatch.

Spiderlings

Spiderlings are similar to adult spiders when it comes to physical appearance.

The Web

The spiders hunt their prey by jumping and chasing. They do not make webs but create silken dwellings near the bark of trees or leaves.

Are Spiders of the Euophrys Genus Venomous

Some species can bite people when they get threatened, but that does not cause any serious harm other than allergies or redness.

Quick Facts

Distribution Windward Islands and Himalaya, South, North, and Central America, Asia, Europe, Oceania, and Africa
Habitat From mountains to woodlands, forested areas to human habitats
Diet Insects, other web and jumping spiders, pollen, nectar.
Lifespan 1-2 years

Did You Know

  • The genus was first described in 1834, by the German arachnologist, Ludwig Carl Christian Koch.
  • The Himalayan Jumping spider, one of the prominent species of this genus, inhabits Mount Everest at an elevation of about 6700 meters.

Image Credits: naturespot.org.uk

Euophrys genus of the jumping spider family containing 108 species is distributed throughout the continents of Oceania, America, Africa, Europe, and Asia.

Spiders Belonging to this Genus

Euophrys Spider
E. acripes E. alabardata E. albimana
E. albopatella E. altera E. alticola
E. arenaria E. astuta E. auricolor
E. baliola E. banksi E. bifida
E. bifoveolata E. bryophila E. canariensis
E. capicola E. catherinae E. cochlea
E. concolorata E. convergentis E. cooki
E. crux E. declivis E. dhaulagirica
E. difficilis E. elizabethae E. evae
E. everestensis E. falciger E. ferrumequinum
E. flavoatra E. frontalis E. fucata
E. gambosa E. gracilis E. granulate
E. griswoldi E. heliophaniformis E. herbigrada
E. innotata E. jirica E. kataokai
E. kawkaban E. kirghizica E. kororensis
E. leipoldti E. leucopalpis E. leucostigma
E. limpopo E. littoralis E. longyangensis
E. lunata E. luteolineata E. manicata
E. marmarica E. maseruensis E. maura
E. megastyla E. melanoleuca E. menemerella
E. meridionalis E. miranda E. monadnock
E. namulinensis E. nana E. nanchonensis
E. nangqianensis E. nepalica E. newtoni
E. nigripalpis E. nigritarsis E. nigromaculata

Himalayan Jumping (Euophrys omnisuperstes)

E. patellaris E. pelzelni
E. peruviana E. petrensis E. pexa
E. proszynskii E. pseudogambosa E. pulchella
E. purcelli E. quadricolor E. quadripunctata
E. recta E. robusta E. rubroclypea
E. rufa E. rufibarbis E. rufimana
E. sanctimatei E. sedula E. semirufa
E. sima E. sinapicolor E. subtilis
E. sulphurea E. tengchongensis E. terrestris
E. testaceozonata E. turkmenica E. uphami
E. uralensis E. valens E. wanyan
E. wenxianensis E. ysobolii E. yulungensis

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: They have a length of 0.03 – 0.98 inches (0.07-2.4 cm), with the males being smaller than the females.

Color: The variation is plenty, as there are different species with exclusive colorations. Some have neon shades like peacock blue, orange, while others come in colors of brown and tan.

Other Characteristic Features: Most spiders of this genus have a hairy appearance. The Himalayan jumping spider has fringes of pale brown hairs on their anterior eyes which are equally spaced.

Eggs

The eggs remain within the silken case, guarded by the females till the time they hatch.

Spiderlings

Spiderlings are similar to adult spiders when it comes to physical appearance.

The Web

The spiders hunt their prey by jumping and chasing. They do not make webs but create silken dwellings near the bark of trees or leaves.

Are Spiders of the Euophrys Genus Venomous

Some species can bite people when they get threatened, but that does not cause any serious harm other than allergies or redness.

Quick Facts

Distribution Windward Islands and Himalaya, South, North, and Central America, Asia, Europe, Oceania, and Africa
Habitat From mountains to woodlands, forested areas to human habitats
Diet Insects, other web and jumping spiders, pollen, nectar.
Lifespan 1-2 years

Did You Know

  • The genus was first described in 1834, by the German arachnologist, Ludwig Carl Christian Koch.
  • The Himalayan Jumping spider, one of the prominent species of this genus, inhabits Mount Everest at an elevation of about 6700 meters.

Image Credits: naturespot.org.uk

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